hypoxia

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Related to intrapartum hypoxia: anemic hypoxia

hypoxia

 [hi-pok´se-ah]
diminished availability of oxygen to the body tissues; its causes are many and varied and includes a deficiency of oxygen in the atmosphere, as in altitude sickness; pulmonary disorders that interfere with adequate ventilation of the lungs; anemia or circulatory deficiencies, leading to inadequate transport and delivery of oxygen to the tissues; and finally, edema or other abnormal conditions of the tissues themselves that impair the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide between capillaries and tissues. adj., adj hypox´ic.  

Signs and symptoms vary according to the cause. Generally they include dyspnea, rapid pulse, syncope, and mental disturbances such as delirium or euphoria. cyanosis is not always present and in some cases is not evident until the hypoxia is far advanced. The localized pain of angina pectoris due to hypoxia occurs because of impaired oxygenation of the myocardium. Discoloration of the skin and eventual ulceration that sometimes accompany varicose veins are a result of hypoxia of the involved tissues.

The treatment of hypoxia depends on the primary cause but usually includes administration of oxygen by inhalation (see oxygen therapy). In some vascular diseases, administration of vasodilators may help increase circulation, hence oxygen supply, to the tissues.
affinity hypoxia hypoxia resulting from failure of the hemoglobin to release oxygen to the tissues, as may occur with a left-shifted oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve.
anemic hypoxia hypoxia due to reduction of the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood as a result of a decrease in the total hemoglobin or an alteration of the hemoglobin constituents.
circulatory hypoxia stagnant hypoxia.
histotoxic hypoxia that due to impaired utilization of oxygen by tissues, as in cyanide poisoning.
hypoxemic hypoxia (hypoxic hypoxia) that due to insufficient oxygen reaching the blood, as at the decreased barometric pressures of high altitudes.
stagnant hypoxia that due to failure to transport sufficient oxygen because of inadequate blood flow, as in heart failure.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

hy·pox·i·a

(hī-pok'sē-ă),
Decrease below normal levels of oxygen in inspired gases, arterial blood, or tissue, without reaching anoxia.
[hypo- + oxygen]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hypoxia

(hī-pŏk′sē-ə, hĭ-)
n.
1. Deficiency in the amount of oxygen reaching body tissues.
2. Depletion of dissolved oxygen in aquatic environments to levels that are detrimental or fatal to aerobic organisms, often caused by eutrophication.

hy·pox′ic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

hypoxia

Cardiology A low O2 concentration in arterial blood. See Cerebral hypoxia.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hy·pox·i·a

(hī-pok'sē-ă)
Lower than normal levels of oxygen in inspired gases, arterial blood, or tissue, short of anoxia.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hypoxia

Deficiency of oxygen in the tissues. Local hypoxia can lead to GANGRENE; general hypoxia to the death of the individual. Hypoxia occurs mainly as a result of obstructive artery disease, especially ATHEROSCLEROSIS. It may also occur from respiratory disease that prevents access of oxygen to the blood, ANAEMIA, certain forms of poisoning and suffocation.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

hypoxia

the reduction of oxygen levels.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Hypoxia

Hypoxia, or altitude sickness, reduces the amount of oxygen in the brain causing such symptoms as dizziness, shortness of breath, and mental confusion.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hypoxia

An inadequate supply of oxygen to tissues. It may occur in some pathological conditions. Examples: in long-standing cases of diabetes there is corneal hypoxia (with consequent high epithelial fragility and some neovascularization) and retinal hypoxia (with consequent neovascularization). Corneal hypoxia (with consequent oedema, loss of sensitivity, etc.) may also occur in contact lens wear. See anoxia; epithelial microcysts; mitosis; oedema; critical oxygen requirement; proliferative retinopathy; corneal exhaustion syndrome; overwear syndrome; tear pumping.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

hy·pox·i·a

(hī-pok'sē-ă)
Decreased below normal levels of oxygen in inspired gases, arterial blood, or tissue, without reaching anoxia.
[hypo- + oxygen]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although a majority of congenital neurological handicaps are not related to intrapartum events, intrapartum monitoring is undertaken to avoid deaths or morbidity due to intrapartum hypoxia. (4) Monitoring is mainly performed by either intermittent auscultation or by Cardiotocography (CTG).
In addition almost half of all fresh stillbirths are due to intrapartum hypoxia, while the burden of brain-damaged children following intrapartum hypoxia is uncertain but remains tragically high.
Parer called the standard for intrapartum hypoxia: evidence of metabolic acidosis in intrapartum fetal, umbilical arterial cord, or very early neonatal blood samples (a pH below 7 and a base deficit of 12 mmol/L or greater).
(5) Of the latter, 46% are clearly attributed to 'intrapartum hypoxia' or antepartum haemorrhage.
Any one of these factors greatly reduces the chance that acute intrapartum hypoxia caused cerebral palsy, according to the statement:
Although a majority of congenital neurological handicaps are not related to intrapartum events, intrapartum hypoxia continues to be responsible for a proportion of these handicaps and for a significant number of perinatal deaths even in the developed world.