radiography

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radiography

 [ra″de-og´rah-fe]
the making of film records (radiographs) of internal structures of the body by exposure of film specially sensitized to x-rays or gamma rays. adj., adj radiograph´ic.
body section radiography tomography.
double-contrast radiography mucosal relief radiography.
electron radiography radiography consisting of electronic images that can be computer enhanced, electronically reversed, stored, retrieved, transmitted, and/or printed on photographic film.
mass radiography examination by x-rays of the general population or of large groups of the population.
mucosal relief radiography a technique for revealing any abnormality of the intestinal mucosa, involving injection and evacuation of a barium enema, followed by inflation of the intestine with air under light pressure. The light coating of barium on the inflated intestine in the radiograph reveals clearly even small abnormalities; double-contrast r.
neutron radiography that in which a narrow beam of neutrons from a nuclear reactor is passed through tissues; especially useful in visualizing bony tissue.
panoramic radiography pantomography.
serial radiography the making of several exposures of a particular area at arbitrary intervals.
spot-film radiography the making of localized instantaneous radiographic exposures; see also spot film.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ra·di·og·ra·phy

(rā'dē-og'ră-fē),
Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of x-rays with the record of the findings usually exposed onto photographic film.
Synonym(s): roentgenography
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

radiography

(rā′dē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The process by which radiographs are made. Also called skiagraphy.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

radiography

Roentgenography, radiographic imaging Imaging The recording of an image of a region placed in a beam of radiation. See Angiography, Cholangiography, CT imaging, Fluoroscopy, GI series, IVP, Mammography, MRI, Venography, Xeroradiography.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ra·di·og·ra·phy

(rā'dē-og'ră-fē)
Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of x-rays with the record of the findings usually impressed on a photographic film.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

radiography

The use of X-radiation to produce images that can help in diagnosis. Radiography includes the use of CT SCANNING, which is an X-ray technique,RADIONUCLIDE SCANNING and, by courtesy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compare RADIOLOGY.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Radiography

Examination of any part of the body through the use of x rays. The process produces an image of shadows and contrasts on film.
Mentioned in: X Rays of the Orbit
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ra·di·og·ra·phy

(rā'dē-og'ră-fē)
Examination of any body part for diagnostic purposes with x-rays with the record of the findings exposed onto photographic film.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, microlens also allows decreasing the sensor's pixel size (6.25 x 6.25 um), therefore increasing image spatial resolution as compared to the larger pixel size of current sensors used in digital intraoral radiography (19 x 19 um), CBCT scans (125 um voxel), and medical fluoroscopy (12.5 x 12.5 um for image intensifiers and 100 x 100 um for flat panel detectors).
Finally, we propose testing the next generation LDXI using head and neck anthropomorphic phantoms following Sections C and D of the FDA guidance for Solid State X-Ray Imaging Devices (MTF, detective quantum efficiency, and signal-to-noise ratio) and compare it to digital intraoral radiography, medical fluoroscopy, and CBCT scan imaging devices.
Lower mA at the X-ray source and high QE at the detector level principles with microlens could be applied not only to digital intraoral radiography and dental fluoroscopy but also to panoramic, cephalometric, and CBCT scans devices to considerably reduce X-ray source dose exposure as well as sensor pixel size and more research is recommended to demonstrate this further.
Uzbelger, "Comparison between medical fluoroscopy, digital dental imaging and intraoral radiography," Journal of Dental Research, vol.
Detection of periodontal bone loss using cone beam C T and intraoral radiography. Dentomaxillofac Radiol.
Keywords: Computer-assisted instruction, lecture, multimedia, intraoral radiography
The content of the multimedia instruction focused on intraoral radiography emphasizing the use of the XCP instrument and the exposure, development, and mounting of intraoral radiographs.
Retention after computer-assisted instruction in intraoral radiography. J Dent Educ 1987;51(2):244-245.
[30.] Stenstrom B, Henrikson CO, Holm B, Richter S: Absorbed doses from intraoral radiography with special emphasis on collimator dimensions.