intraoperative blood salvage


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intraoperative blood salvage

Intraoperative autologous transfusion Transfusion medicine A procedure in which the blood shed or otherwise lost into an operative field is collected sterilely, washed, filtered and reinfused as a packed unit of RBCs; IAT is suited for 'bloody' heart–eg, aortic aneurysms or CABG or orthopedic surgery–eg, hip arthrodesis, ↓ Pt exposure to multiple donors and may be used with pre-deposit autologous donation, where packed red cells are collected from the Pt before surgery. See Surgical blood management. Cf Autologous transfusion.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intraoperative blood salvage in abdominal simple total hysterectomy for uterine myoma.
Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma - is there a risk of recurrence caused by intraoperative blood salvage autotransfusion?
Preoperative autologous blood donation versus intraoperative blood salvage: intraindividual analyses and modeling of efficacy in 1103 patients.
Intraoperative blood salvage was developed in the 1970s and has been applied in orthopedic, cardiovascular and neurosurgery ever since [8].
The process of intraoperative blood salvage consists of three phases: blood collection (aspiration of blood from the surgical field), blood processing (centrifugation and washing with heparinized saline solution) and reinfusion.
While ClotGel is similar in appearance and efficacy to the leading hemostatic agent Floseal, it does not contain thrombin allowing for intraoperative blood salvage and minimal swelling.
The advantages of intraoperative blood salvage are technical simplicity, low cost and availability (Lemos & Healy 1996).
Intraoperative blood salvage is a valuable technique for reducing the need for autologous blood donation for elective surgery and for homologous blood in emergency surgery.
The panel says other safe alternatives, such as intraoperative blood salvage (collecting blood from a patient during an operation for subsequent use) and hemodilution (removing blood and substituting other fluids to keep blood volume up) are useful in selected cases, while some of the more innovative approaches, including artificial blood, remain experimental.
It also goes into serologic testing, record keeping, releasing unused blood, and intraoperative blood salvage.

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