intradermal test


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skin test

a method for determining induced sensitivity (allergy) by applying an antigen (allergen) to, or inoculating it into, the skin; induced sensitivity (allergy) to the specific antigen is indicated by an inflammatory reaction of one of two general kinds: 1) immediate, appears in minutes and is dependent on circulating immunoglobulins (antibodies); 2) delayed, appears in 12-48 hours and is not dependent on these soluble substances but on cellular response and infiltration.

intradermal test

n.
A test for hypersensitivity or allergy in which a small amount of the suspected allergen is injected into the skin.

skin test

(skin test)
A method for determining induced sensitivity (allergy) by applying an antigen (allergen) to, or inoculating it into, the skin; induced sensitivity (allergy) to the specific antigen is indicated by an inflammatory reaction of one of two general kinds: 1) immediate, appears in minutes to an hour or so and in general is dependent on circulating immunoglobulins (antibodies); 2) delayed, appears in 12-48 hours and is not dependent on these soluble substances but on cellular response and infiltration.
Synonym(s): intradermal test.

skin test

(skin test)
A method for determining induced sensitivity (allergy) by applying an antigen (allergen) to, or inoculating it into, the skin; induced sensitivity (allergy) to the specific antigen is indicated by an inflammatory reaction.
Synonym(s): intradermal test.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prick and intradermal tests compared with specific IgE in allergic assessment.
Intradermal test with one single dilution: Usually a 1:1000 weight/ volume dilution of the allergen is injected, and if reactive, the result is considered positive.
[11] Prick tests are superior to scratch tests because they are more sensitive, more reproducible, and correlate better with intradermal tests. [12] They can be performed in a variety of ways, but the type of testing greatly influences the results.
Skin sensitivity to rocuronium and vecuronium: Prick tests are not intradermal tests. Anesth Analg 2005; 100:1539.
Two patients with a history of allergy to eggs had negative intradermal tests to propofol and were challenged uneventfully with progressive intravenous doses.
In the case of negative SPT, skin intradermal tests (IDT) were made with dilutions at 1:100 and 1:10 and undiluted with PPL, MDM, and suspected antibiotic.
In 1955, 3 febrile children (siblings) admitted to a hospital in Havana, Cuba, were diagnosed with CSD based on their symptoms and the positive results of intradermal tests using the Foshay antigen (3).
Occasionally, if intradermal tests reveal an allergy to a specific agent, hyposensitization, by injecting increasing amounts of the allergen, may lead to a cure.
"Prick" test and intradermal tests should be performed in reactions which occur in the first hour and intradermal patch test should be performed in reactions which occur after one hour.
We recommend intradermal testing over skin-prick testing as there have been several cases (21) involving negative skin-prick results to blue dyes, when subsequent intradermal tests were positive.
Intradermal tests were performed with the same allergen extract in a 1:2,000 dilution and administered by 25-gauge syringes.
The intradermal tests were negative for Xylocaine [R] 2% (lignocaine) at dilution 0.02 to 2 mg/ml, for Sufenta [R] 0.5 [micro]g/ml, for Tracrium [R] 0.1 mg/ml, but positive for Diprivan [R] at dilution 0.1 mg/ml (8x7 mm) and 1 mg/ml (10x8 mm).