intractable

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re·frac·to·ry

(rē-frak'tōr-ē),
1. Resistant to treatment, as of a disease. Synonym(s): intractable (1) , obstinate (2)
2. Synonym(s): obstinate (1)
[L. refractarius, fr. refringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

intractable

adjective Unresponsive to therapy or intervention; e.g., refractory, recalcitrant.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ob·sti·nate

(ob'sti-năt)
1. Firmly adhering to one's own purpose or opinion, even when proven wrong; not yielding to argument, persuasion, or entreaty.
Synonym(s): intractable (2) , refractory (2) .
2. Synonym(s): refractory (1) .
[L. obstinatus, determined]

re·frac·to·ry

(rĕ-frak'tŏr-ē)
1. Resistant to treatment, as of a disease.
Synonym(s): intractable (1) , obstinate (2) .
2. Synonym(s): obstinate (1) .
[L. refractarius, fr. refringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

intractable

Resistant to cure.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
An example would be where two patients are in the same condition of 'mere existence', both terminally ill and suffering intractably. Patient A is kept alive with a ventilator, while Patient B is able to breathe by himself.
Some injuries signal the sickness of the city: A patient with a gunshot wound most likely comes from Chicago's most economically depressed, intractably violent, and civically abandoned neighborhoods, and has usually been there all of his or her life.
In short, each scale of analysis, or level of abstraction, is useful--the more abstract scales allow us to predict higher order phenomena without simulating intractably complicated systems; the less abstract levels of description allow us to capture phenomena that may be inexpressible at greater abstractions.
The Vestries were also intractably parsimonious in expenditure for welfare and health.
was walking intractably toward military intervention in Syria." Praise goes to Secretary of State John Kerry and President Barack Obama for seizing the opportunity that Russia's last-minute intervention in this crisis allowed.
If one is intractably devoted to comparing epistemic probabilities for different hypotheses, however, one might try adapting to biology Robin Collins's rigorous likelihood argument for the superiority of theistic design over multiverse explanations of cosmological fine-tuning.
Countering the notion that France has been and remains intractably anti-American, Singer (emeritus, history, Brock U.), instead argues that France began a transformation the 1950s in which it shifted its focus from colonial concern with Algeria towards American-style celebration of personal happiness and an embrace of American culture and values, even suggesting that this embrace of America has proceeded "too unabashedly in contemporary France." He brings a biographical approach to the subject, examining key figures that illustrate the turn of soldiers from sober military values to seeking American-style materialism, the development of French rock and roll, and the contemporary "full anchoring" of Americanization in France.
Although beset by economic woes and intractably high unemployment rates, European countries -- at least by one ranking -- are still among the best places to live.
China remains intractably opposed to interference in Syria's internal affairs.
It is dirty, backward, corrupt, and intractably poor; yet it is also beautiful, tranquil, magical, and spiritually rich.
In so far as the human condition is intractably ambiguous, this will always be the case.
And were those richly upholstered chairs, in some intractably pansexual way, Oedipal phenomena?