intracranial haematoma

intracranial haematoma

A nonspecific term for any intracranial collection of blood, regardless of location or aetiology.
 
Types
Extradural, subdural, subarachnoid, intracerebral.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Removal of intracranial haematoma and decompressive craniectomy were performed under general anaesthesia.
Macpherson et al found in their study that out of 850 patients of fractures, intracranial haematoma was seen in 71% of cases.
The seven-times champion was admitted to Grenoble Hospital in France suffering from intracranial haematoma - blood clots - bruising and swelling of the brain.
Professor Stephan Chabardes, the neurosurgeon who operated on Schumacher, said he had been admitted suffering from intracranial haematoma - blood clots - bruising and swelling of the brain.
Risks of acute traumatic intracranial haematoma in children and adults: implications for managing head injuries.
Acute subdural haematoma is a common type of intracranial haematoma occurring from head injuries.
Don't forget to document the head circumference and haemoglobin at the first consultation as changes in either of these parameters may indicate an expanding intracranial haematoma in an infant.
If it is necessary to infuse an osmotic agent to prevent or control the intracranial pressure, the administration of hypertonic saline could be a better option than the administration of mannitol, mainly in patients with intracranial haematomas or those who are at a high risk of bleeding.
The records were reviewed for demographics, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), pupillary reactivity, haemoglobin (Hb) on admission, computerized tomography (CT) scan findings, associated intracranial haematomas, extracranial injuries, management and outcomes at discharge using the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS).
There are reports of the ability to follow-up on the size of intracranial haematomas, position shunt catheters, (17) monitor midline shifts, or follow-up after treatment.
There is now good evidence that the results of surgery for traumatic intracranial haematomas becomes such worse as age in increases beyond 65[21].
4 Even though this surgical procedure has been shown to be successful in reducing the frequency of seizures, the risks of morbidity, which includes hydrocephalus, intracranial haematomas and infections, remain high.

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