intracorporeal

in·tra·cor·po·re·al

(in'tră-kōr-pō'ē-ăl),
1. Within the body.
2. Within any structure anatomically styled a corpus.
[intra- + L. corpus, body]

in·tra·cor·po·re·al

(in'tră-kōr-pōr'ē-ăl)
1. Within the body.
2. Within any structure anatomically styled a corpus.
[intra- + L. corpus, body]
References in periodicals archive ?
Introducing miniaturized modern ureteroscopes, developing effective intracorporeal lithotripsy methods and disposable equipment, and improving the optical quality all enhances the urologist's surgical ability; therefore, problems related to stone impaction in the ureter have decreased.
The fourth factor, intracorporeal biological mechanism, e.
The laparoscopic group included laparoscopic-assisted procedures (with intracorporeal dissection and vessel ligation with extraction and anastomosis through a 5 cm midline umbilical incision) and hand-assisted laparoscopic procedures (with the hand port placed at the suprapubic transverse incision used to extract and anastomose the bowel).
A leading surgeon in Southern California performed several right hemicolectomies with intracorporeal anastomosis, a surgical procedure to remove the right side of the large intestine when impacted by cancer or Crohn's disease;
Hooman Nourchashm, a cardiothoracic surgeon, reiterated his call for a worldwide moratorium on all gynecological tissue morcellation devices and on the practice of intracorporeal uterine morcellation during minimally invasive hysterectomy.
org web site which reads: "Place an immediate moratorium on intracorporeal uterine morcellation during minimally invasive hysterectomy, on all gynecological tissue morcellation devices and any devices, used to morcellate the uterus intracorporeally in the United States and Abroad.
A sudden increase in intracorporeal pressure due to blunt trauma could easily result in rupture (1-4).
The opposing myometrial edges were sutured with a combination of interrupted and continuous simple intracorporeal sutures with 1.
Initially pneumatic drills were used to break the stones; these lithotripters were powered electrically and used invasively, and hence called intracorporeal lithotripters.
There is limitation of the degrees of freedom of movement and of dexterity with the use of conventional laparoscopy, leading to difficulty in performing complex tasks such as lymph node removal and intracorporeal knot-tying.