intonation

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in·to·na·tion

(in-tō-nā'shŭn),
The quality of speech derived from the modulation of intensity, frequency, and juncture that provides emphasis and additional meaning.

in·to·na·tion

(in'tō-nā'shŭn)
During speech, a pattern of change in voice used to convey linguistic information such as syllabic accent stress or pitch variations to signal interrogation, declaration, or exclamation; used to convey emotion by patterns of change in pitch, loudness, and speech rate.
[L. intonare, to thunder or to make a loud noise]
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper is an attempt at discovering the intricacies of the intonation patterns of different types of interrogative sentences in Modern Conversational Persian, hereafter referred to as Persian, spoken in Tehran, the capital city of Iran.
For each session, the children received a separate score for appropriate verbal comments, intonations, facial expressions, and gestures by dividing the number of correct responses by 9, the total number of trials.
Speaker intonations and emotions can be detected and represented using EmotionML, a language under development by the World Wide Web Consortium's Multimodal Interaction Working Group.
Washington, Jan 28 (ANI): People who can change intonation in speech are more empathetic, according to a new study.
In contrast, infants who heard the sentences in adult intonations showed no such preference for whole words.
Different intonations could give varying meanings to the same verbal statement.
Dwight Bolinger identifies two question intonations, the rising intonation on yes-no questions (99-106) and a sharp fall with a secondary rise on wh- questions (106).
Barthelmie, with her British accent and intonations, reads with great empathy and skill.
Although other British accents have recognisable intonations, the particularly melodic nature of the Welsh accent with its rises and falls in pitch, thought to have developed as a result of the influence of the Welsh language, is unique.
In a nutshell: ``Let the world have its way with her,'' gravely intone the men so evil the only way they can speak is in grave intonations.
As Stanislavsky writes in An Actor Prepares: "At first they feel the part, but when once they have done so they do not go on feeling it anew, they merely remember and repeat the external movements, intonations, and expressions they worked out at first, making this repetition without emotion.
Johnson writes with conviction and utter veracity about the inner lives of wounded people; and despite the book's predictability and melodramatic intonations, its value hinges on the lessons taught and the power of love, forgiveness and mercy.