intonation

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in·to·na·tion

(in-tō-nā'shŭn),
The quality of speech derived from the modulation of intensity, frequency, and juncture that provides emphasis and additional meaning.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·to·na·tion

(in'tō-nā'shŭn)
During speech, a pattern of change in voice used to convey linguistic information such as syllabic accent stress or pitch variations to signal interrogation, declaration, or exclamation; used to convey emotion by patterns of change in pitch, loudness, and speech rate.
[L. intonare, to thunder or to make a loud noise]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper reports the results of an experiment designed to reexamine the existence of an imperative intonation in Spanish by investigating acoustic cues at the local pitch-accent level.
The only compositions newly published here are three short settings by Hugo Distler (1908-1942), previously available only in manuscript at the Stadtbibliothek der Hansestadt, Lubeck: a harmonization of Philipp Nicolai's great chorale melody "Wie schon leuchtet der Morgenstern" and two intonations on Martin Luther's "Erhalt uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort." But if the repertory in these volumes will not be startlingly new for most organists, it is convenient nonetheless to have so many compositionally well crafted, brief chorale preludes brought together in one place and ordered logically according to the liturgical year and the topical order of the Evangelisches Gesangbuch.
In the grammatical introduction to his Livonian dictionary, Lauri Kettunen (1938) presents a detailed section on intonation. The section begins with a short description of Latvian "intonations" based on J anis Endzelins's grammar.
'It's a direct transfer of features from the Welsh language to English in the same way that if you hear a French person speaking English, certain intonations from the language transfer.'
Narrator Gibbons is perfect, with her Southern intonations and matter-of-fact delivery.
In the third film of the trilogy, The End (teleteatro), 1999 Valentina Cortese declaims the Beatles song "Help!" in a manner so over the top in its hysterical gesticulations and intonations that it actually succeeds in being truly weird.
Because the words were unrecognizable, they had to detect lies using nonverbal cues and speech intonations.
Mayes' first novel is superbly narrated by Monk, who brings just the right intonations to this evocative story.
Let her lead, said the groom.), the narrative is more wayward, the sexual intonations couched in metaphor, the sex itself happening off the page.
The woman studied by Young's group displayed marked difficulty in understanding vocal intonations used to express emotions, particularly fear and anger.
Varying accents and skillful intonations enhance Prichard's vocal characterizations.
Dylan puffs himself up with the declamatory intonations of Humphrey Bogart at the end of The Maltese Falcon, Mary Astor in his arms but spurning her pleas for deliverance: "I won't because all of me wants to." The rhythm is lost.