intonation

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in·to·na·tion

(in-tō-nā'shŭn),
The quality of speech derived from the modulation of intensity, frequency, and juncture that provides emphasis and additional meaning.

in·to·na·tion

(in'tō-nā'shŭn)
During speech, a pattern of change in voice used to convey linguistic information such as syllabic accent stress or pitch variations to signal interrogation, declaration, or exclamation; used to convey emotion by patterns of change in pitch, loudness, and speech rate.
[L. intonare, to thunder or to make a loud noise]
References in periodicals archive ?
The focus of Williams' sensibility in imagination is carried by his free verse prosody, which cross-cuts both voicing and syntax, therefore turning up intonational contours into quizzical rising contours, both internal to the line and at line peripheries, while breaking the continuity of the voice and syntax at line breaks, fragmenting the syntax internal to the line, often fashioning lines that are just a heap of unrelated syntactic constituents, and often stranding function words, specifiers, and adverbials, constituents that are peripheral in the syntax, at line peripheries.
Gardner (1981) noted "initial observations confirm that children's babbling includes melodic and intonational as well as phonological experimentation" (p.
This study examines the phonetic characteristics of certain intonational events in the speech of nonnative adult learners of Spanish who are involved in romantic relationships with native Spanish speakers.
In line 30, IR emphasises and stretches the word 'know', denoted by the inserted colon, takes a breath at the beginning of line 31, before delivering 'why' in an elongated manner, twisting its intonational pattern, pausing, then delivering a sped-up reference to the 30 years of failure she mentioned in her introduction.
Roughly speaking, evidentiality in Brazilian Portuguese is expressed lexically by (i) verbal expressions employing verbs of hearing or seeing; (ii) adverbial expressions; and (iii) mirativity, which can also be coded in this language in different ways: (a) by the lexicon; (b) by, for instance, exclamativeintonational patterns; and (c) by mirative-like constructions that combine unusual grammatical devices and intonational patterns.
Este autor ingles define a este termino de la siguiente manera: "a form of speech which the native listener may not identify as non-native, which conveys information as readily as would a native's and which arrives at this result through precision in the phonetic realization of phonemes and by confident handling of accentual and intonational patterns.
Intonational invariance under changes in pitch range and length.
They share features such as the frequent use of repetition, of formulaic expressions, expansions, preference for simplified vocabulary, change in voice volume, and modification of intonational contours.
At this stage intonational data will not be considered, although this could play a very important role in the classification of a clause in a sentence.
Thus, rising intonation forms part of the Estonian intonational phonology and should be included in the model of natural spoken Estonian.
Vocal behaviors that evoke caregiver attention and interaction evolve from cooing, babbling, and jargon that increasingly contain adult-like speech elements, including syllable patterns and intonational contours, and evoke verbal responses from caregivers (i.
It is furthermore assumed that this length distinction is sometimes realized as an intonational opposition" (de Vaan 1999: 38).