intonation

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in·to·na·tion

(in-tō-nā'shŭn),
The quality of speech derived from the modulation of intensity, frequency, and juncture that provides emphasis and additional meaning.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·to·na·tion

(in'tō-nā'shŭn)
During speech, a pattern of change in voice used to convey linguistic information such as syllabic accent stress or pitch variations to signal interrogation, declaration, or exclamation; used to convey emotion by patterns of change in pitch, loudness, and speech rate.
[L. intonare, to thunder or to make a loud noise]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Once he had decided to confront head-on the challenge of writing music for conventional instruments using complex microtonal tunings and of re-educating the intonational habits of performers, the transformation in his musical output was rapid.
Are learners in the United States who interact frequently with native speakers of Spanish capable of acquiring dialect-specific intonational targets?
As intermediate phrases are not used in the intonational transcription for Estonian (Asu 2004), the optimal phonological analysis for the fall-rise accent of Kihnu would be [H.sup.*]L H%.
There is relative agreement in the literature on the fact that all languages make use of intonation but that the difference between tonal and intonational languages is in the domain of use (Pierrehumbert 1992; Crutenden, 1986).
One or more APs make up an Intonational Phrase (IP) which usually corresponds
One of the perplexing facts about Williams's use of line breaks is their apparent inconsistency, for lines extend to varying lengths and break on all parts of speech, violating both intonational and syntactic phrases, along with any simple notion of why he broke lines as he did.
--2002: Intonational Marking of Contrastive Focus in Madrid Spanish.
Pols et al.; Intonational variation in the British Isles (2002) Esther Grabe and Brechtje Post.
In the spirit of Asafjev's concept of music as an intonational art, in which composer and composition interpret the "intonational awareness of the age", I want in this text to draw attention to certain "Art Nouveau" parallels, certainly not based on direct mutual influence but nonetheless very striking, between Novak's early piano compositions, Suk's piano compositions, and the piano music written by the founder of Lithuanian national professional music, Mikalojus Konstantinas Ciurlionis (1875-1911), who is better known in the world today as a painter, but who produced an original and quite large corpus of music.