intonation

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in·to·na·tion

(in-tō-nā'shŭn),
The quality of speech derived from the modulation of intensity, frequency, and juncture that provides emphasis and additional meaning.

in·to·na·tion

(in'tō-nā'shŭn)
During speech, a pattern of change in voice used to convey linguistic information such as syllabic accent stress or pitch variations to signal interrogation, declaration, or exclamation; used to convey emotion by patterns of change in pitch, loudness, and speech rate.
[L. intonare, to thunder or to make a loud noise]
References in periodicals archive ?
Since there is a high correlation between positive temperatures and positive attitudes as well as between negative temperatures and negative attitudes, we infer that it is the head that regulates this evaluative aspect of intonational meaning, the high head being mainly used to express positive, and the low head to express negative attitudes.
The discovery of this new component of the brain's electrical activity suggests that the detection of intonational phrases is a crucial aspect of speech perception, note psychologists Cyma Van Petten and Paul Bloom of the University of Arizona in Tucson in a commentary on Steinhauer's article.
Despite these difficulties, today we understand intonation to be an integral part of the prosodic organization of a language, that is, the audible chunking of language into discrete units from the prosodic word and phonological phrase, at the lower levels, to the intonational phrase and the utterance, at the higher levels.
Syntactic, Intonational, and Pragmatic Resources for the Management of Turns.
43]), nor why there are specific syntactic and intonational constraints on "scalar" deja (cf.
One of the perplexing facts about Williams's use of line breaks is their apparent inconsistency, for lines extend to varying lengths and break on all parts of speech, violating both intonational and syntactic phrases, along with any simple notion of why he broke lines as he did.
The study includes an acoustic comparison between sentences produced in contrastive and non-contrastive contexts, quantification of intonational realization in terms of the height and position of tonal targets, and rating experiments to test the perceptual reality of different productions and the relevance of different acoustic cues.
In the spirit of Asafjev's concept of music as an intonational art, in which composer and composition interpret the "intonational awareness of the age", I want in this text to draw attention to certain "Art Nouveau" parallels, certainly not based on direct mutual influence but nonetheless very striking, between Novak's early piano compositions, Suk's piano compositions, and the piano music written by the founder of Lithuanian national professional music, Mikalojus Konstantinas Ciurlionis (1875-1911), who is better known in the world today as a painter, but who produced an original and quite large corpus of music.
In ancient theory, the sruti was a microinterval--there were twenty-two to an octave--while in modern practice the term refers to the general concept of intonational inflection.
The first interpretation, which uses taparsi in a normal adverbial manner, demands an intonational pause after gzira, whereas the second interpretation, which promotes the adverb to a proper noun, places the pause after taparsi.
In what follows I will suggest that our ability to handle conflicting cues too is based on our phonetic competence, an ability characterized by Philip Lieberman (60) as "the listeners perceive these signals by means of a feedback mechanism of the analysis-by-synthesis type, in which they use their knowledge of the phonologic features that produce intonational signals.