intolerance

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Related to intolerances: Food sensitivity, Food intolerances

intolerance

 [in-tol´er-ans]
inability to withstand or consume; inability to absorb or metabolize nutrients.
activity intolerance a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which a person has insufficient physiological or psychological energy to endure or complete necessary or desired daily activities. Causes include generalized weakness, sedentary lifestyle, imbalance between oxygen supply and demand, and bed rest or immobility. Defining characteristics include verbal report of fatigue or weakness, abnormal heart rate or blood pressure response to activity, exertional discomfort, and dyspnea.
carbohydrate intolerance inability to properly metabolize one or more carbohydrate(s), such as glucose, fructose, or one of the disaccharides.
disaccharide intolerance inability to properly metabolize one or more disaccharide(s), usually due to deficiency of the corresponding disaccharidase(s), although it may have other causes such as impaired absorption. After ingestion of the disaccharide there may be abdominal symptoms such as diarrhea, flatulence, borborygmus, distention, and pain. One common type is lactose intolerance.
drug intolerance the state of reacting to the normal pharmacologic doses of a drug with the symptoms of overdosage.
exercise intolerance limitation of ability to perform work or exercise at normally accepted levels, as measured in exercise testing.
glucose intolerance inability to properly metabolize glucose, a type of carbohydrate intolerance; see diabetes mellitus.
lactose intolerance a disaccharide intolerance specific for lactose, usually due to an inherited deficiency of lactase activity in the intestinal mucosa.
risk for activity intolerance a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which an individual is at risk of having insufficient physiological or psychological energy to endure or complete required daily activities. See also activity intolerance.
Patient Care. Nursing activities and interventions are aimed at identifying those factors that contribute to activity intolerance, providing evidence of the patient's progress to the higher level of activity possible for the patient, and reducing signs of physiologic intolerance to increased activity (blood pressure and respiratory and pulse rates). Once the contributing factors are identified, plans are made to avoid or minimize them. For example, if inadequate sleep or rest periods are a factor, the nurse plans with the patient scheduled periods of uninterrupted rest during the day. Inadequate sleep at night should be assessed and appropriate interventions planned and implemented. Making an objective record of the patient's progress toward increased activity tolerance can help alleviate depression or lack of incentive, both of which can be contributing factors. Such assessment data could include measurements of blood pressure, pulse, and respiratory rates before and after an activity, gradual increase in the distance walked, and gradual resumption of responsibility for activities of daily living.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·tol·er·ance

(in-tol'ĕr-ăns),
Abnormal metabolism, excretion, or other disposition of a given substance; term often used to indicate impaired use or disposal of dietary constituents.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

intolerance

(ĭn-tŏl′ər-əns)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being intolerant; lack of tolerance.
2. Medicine Inability to digest or metabolize a food, drug, or other substance or compound: lactose intolerance.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

intolerance

Medtalk
1. Extreme discomfort with a particular environmental condition. See Cold intolerance, Heat intolerance.
2. Inability to metabolize or excrete a particular substance. See Food intolerance, Hereditary fructose intolerance, Lactose intolerance, Milk intolerance, Orthostatic intolerance.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·tol·er·ance

(in-tol'ĕr-ăns)
1. Abnormal metabolism, excretion, or other disposition of a given substance; term often used to indicate impaired use or disposal of dietary constituents.
2. Incapacity for enduring or the effects of specific medications.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

intolerance

A tendency to react adversely to stimuli of any kind or to drugs or foodstuffs.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

in·tol·er·ance

(in-tol'ĕr-ăns)
Abnormal metabolism, excretion, or other disposition of a given substance; term often used to indicate impaired use or disposal of dietary constituents.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about intolerance

Q. What is the difference between intolerance and allergy? Is there any point in which intolerance to a certain food (say milk or eggs for example) turns into an allergy or are they totally unrelated? Is intolerance showing up only as digestion problems and not other allergy symptoms? Can you mistakenly interpret intolerance as allergy in blood tests or vice versa?

A. Webmd.com has an article that will give you some insights on the matter
See link bellow.

http://www.webmd.com/allergies/foods-allergy-intolerance

Q. can you be lactose intolerant just in the morning? if i drink milk or eat a dairy product in the morning i get nausous, vomit and have diarehha. but i eat dairy products in the evening and im fine. is it possible to be lactose intolerant just in the morning?

A. Not that I'm aware of.. You are either lactose intolerant or you're not. However, it depends on how much dairy products you eat, and perhaps you consume more dairy products in the morning, on an empty stomach, where it all absorbs, where as in the evening you might eat less and combine it with other food. I would suggest you dicrease the total amount of dairy you eat, in order to get rid of these symptms.

Q. lactose intolerant If you are lactose intolerant and you consume a dairy related product can it cause a fever?

A. No
Lactose Intolerance means you lack the enzyme to digest milk.
You get diarrhea NOT fever
DrMDK

More discussions about intolerance
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to guidelines issued by the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) food intolerances and allergies among children have increased by over 50 per cent since 1990.
28% Allergy UK advises that intolerances "can be caused by different factors, such as lifestyles with erratic food intake and poor nutritional intake or high intakes of refined foods, poor intakes of dietary fibre or high fat diets".
More than who think intolerance due to But there is evidence that the number of people who really shouldn't be eating those foods might be considerably lower.
Many experts say food intolerances are on the rise.
Hardly surprising, given that more than one in five adults now avoid certain food and drink, most commonly gluten and dairy, because of an allergy or intolerance, according to research by the Food and Drink Innovation Network.
Many who suffer from reactions to foods confuse allergies with intolerances, yet it is important for dietitians to distinguish this difference, as treatment depends on first administering the correct method of testing.
If you think you suffer from intolerances, we recommend you start a food and symptoms diary, which we can help you with.
Irritable bowel syndrome and Chrohn's disease are some of the main medical conditions associated with food intolerances, but there are multiple other symptoms as well.
So what's the difference between food allergies and intolerances? "The effects of intolerance are slower-building and harder to identify.
In most cases food intolerances are confused with food allergies.