intestinal polyp


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intestinal polyp

Colorectal polyp. See Polyp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inulins treatments diminished the number of intestinal polyps (indicated by black arrows) compared with control group, which showed damage in intestinal mucosa.
Salmon, mackerel, trout, sardines, pilchards and herrings) are rich in EPA (eicosapentanoic acid), a substance that can halt the growth of some cancer cells, reduce the risk of intestinal polyps and reverse weight loss in cancer patients.
Fortunately, fewer than one percent of intestinal polyps become malignant, but when cancerous changes do occur, early detection greatly increases the likelihood of cure.
Has anyone really been heard to remark, "Since I don't have to pay for it, I think I'll go develop some intestinal polyps. A colonoscopy sounds like a lot of fun.
But of the 33% of people who tested positive over the course of the study, only 2% were found by colonoscopy to have cancer (another 30% of them had intestinal polyps, but only a small percentage of these were the type that will develop into cancer).
Intestinal polyps, mucosal protuberances from the epithelial lining of the lumen of the colon and rectum, can vary in size and shape, occur anywhere in the colon or rectum, and vary in histopathology.
This assessment provides guidance for the clinical treatment and prognostic evaluation of Crohn's disease.6,7 CTE also has advantages in diagnosing intestinal polyps.8 For intestinal obstruction caused by lesions, tumours, or unknown causes, CTE shows an accurate diagnosis rate of upper intestinal obstruction, whereas CTE provided an accurate diagnosis rate of only 48% for lower intestinal obstruction9,10
26 for non-cancerous intestinal polyps. His office said he had a second, successful half-hour procedure on Saturday but gave no other details.
The aetiology of this condition, as with volvulus, is unclear; while intestinal polyps or amoebomas account for a minority, there is no obvious clue in most cases.
The double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 80 human volunteers, who had either intestinal polyps removed or had been treated for colon cancer.
The most common cause is bleeding--usually of a slow, chronic nature--from ulcers, uterine tumors, intestinal polyps, and the like.
Recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Willett study followed almost 89,000 women, registered nurses with no previous history of cancer, bowel disease, or family history of intestinal polyps (sometimes a forerunner of colon cancer).