intestinal juice


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juice

 [jo̳s]
any fluid from animal or plant tissue.
gastric juice see gastric juice.
intestinal juice the liquid secretion of glands in the intestinal lining.
pancreatic juice the enzyme-containing secretion of the pancreas, conducted through its ducts to the duodenum.
prostatic juice the liquid secretion of the prostate, which contributes to semen formation.

in·tes·ti·nal juice

an alkaline straw-colored fluid secreted by the intestinal glands; its enzymes (peptidases, saccharases, nucleases, lecithinases, phosphatases, lipases) complete the hydrolysis of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids.

intestinal juice

A nonspecific, generic term for the sum total of intestinal secretions after the stomach, which consists of secretions from the exocrine pancreas via the ampulla of Vater. The key digestive enzyme, trypsin, is secreted in the inactive form as trypsinogen and activated by enterokinase in the intestine; trypsin in turn activates other proteases—e.g., pro-colipase, which is converted to colipase. Intestinal juice contains bile salts, digestive enzymes, mucus, hormones and high-pH secretions, which neutralise hydrochloric acid of gastric origin.

in·tes·ti·nal juice

(in-testi-năl jūs)
Alkaline straw-colored fluid secreted by the intestinal glands.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 showed the representative chromatograms of a blank intestinal juice, an intestinal juice samples spiked with both the analytes and the I.S.
Webster's Unabridged Dictionary defines digestion as, "to change food in the mouth, stomach, and intestines by the action of gastric and intestinal juices, enzymes, and bacteria so that it can be absorbed by the body." Digestion is that wondrous, yet delicate, process that allows us to assimilate, not only food, but life itself.
Nonprotein nitrogen is increased (60%) as a result of the proteolytic activity of intestinal juices and digestive tract enzymes.

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