intestinal fluke


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intestinal fluke

Etymology: L, intestinum + AS, floc
any internal parasite of the genera Fasciolopsis, Heterophyes, and Metagonimus in North America and of other genera in Asia and in tropical countries. They enter the body through the mouth as encysted larvae in aquatic vegetation or freshwater fish. Symptoms of intestinal fluke infestation usually include abdominal pain and obstruction and diarrhea.

in·tes·ti·nal fluke

(in-tes'ti-năl flūk)
Any of various trematodes parasitizing the human small intestine; severe infection may cause ulceration, malabsorption, and obstruction.

intestinal fluke

Any of several species of flukes infesting the intestine in humans. They include Gastrodiscoides hominis, Fasciolopsis buski, Heterophyes heterophyes, and Metagonimus yokogawai.
See also: fluke
References in periodicals archive ?
All trematodes recovered from necropsy samples were fishborne-zoonotic intestinal flukes (Table 2).
Although intestinal flukes are less well characterized clinically than liver flukes, they are increasingly being recognized as a cause of intestine, heart, brain, and spinal cord abnormalities in humans (1,4,8,23).
However, the life span of intestinal flukes in humans is not well documented.
Intestinal flukes, including Haplorchis pumilio and Centrocestus formosanus, were found in 55.
No estimates are currently available regarding populations at risk for intestinal flukes.