intestinal atresia


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in·tes·ti·nal a·tre·si·a

an obliteration of the lumen of the small intestine, with the ileum involved in 50% of cases and the jejunum and duodenum next in frequency; most frequent cause of intestinal obstruction in the newborn; etiology may be related to a failure of recanalization during early development or to some impairment of blood supply during intrauterine life.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·tes·ti·nal a·tre·si·a

(in-tes'ti-năl ă-trē'zē-ă)
An obliteration of the lumen of the small intestine, with the ileum involved in 50% of cases and the jejunum and duodenum next in frequency; most frequent cause of intestinal obstruction in the newborn; etiology may be related to a failure of recanalization during early development or to some impairment of blood supply during intrauterine life.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

intestinal atresia

Congenital closure of any part of the intestine.
See also: atresia
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Histochemical changes in intestinal atresia and its implications on surgical management: A preliminary report.
5 Associated with 50%-60% 10%-20% prematurity 6 Necrotising Common (18%) Uncommon enterocolitis 7 Common associated Gastrointestinal Trisomy syndromes anomalies (10%-25%), (30%), cardiac intestinal atresia, defects (20%), malrotation, Beckwith-Weidman cryptorchidism (31%) syndrome, bladder exstrophy 8 Prognosis Excellent for small Varies with defect associated anomalies 9 Mortality 5%-10% Varies with anomalies (80% in cardiac defects)
The portosystemic shunt and hyperammonemia in our patient can be considered an incidental finding or possibly a developmental defect along with the intestinal atresia. The shunt in our baby closed spontaneously and the ammonia level returned to normal.
Different types of intestinal atresia in identical twins.
(2) His work on the pathogenesis of intestinal atresia is a good example of this belief.
This patient who delivered this baby with intestinal atresia is a fourth gravida, nonconsanguineous couple, who had a third baby with abnormality and was terminated.
In contrast to small intestinal atresia, ontogeny is thought to be secondary to failure of luminal recanalization [2].
Dr J H (Jannie) Louw, a general surgeon by training, had his interest in PS awakened in 1944 by the death, due to intestinal atresia at 11 days, of his first-born son.
Kpila: Congenital small bowel diverticulosis and intestinal atresia: A rare association.
Abnormalities of enteric neurons, intestinal pacemaker cells, and smooth muscle in human intestinal atresia. J Pediatr Surg.
The proposed hypothesis is about an association of dilated bowel resulting from intestinal atresia along with impaired vascular supply caused by inflammation occurring after intestinal perforation.