interview

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in·ter·view

(in'tĕr-vyū),
Interpersonal meeting or consultation for the purpose of obtaining information.
[Fr. entrevue, fr. L. inter-, among, + video, to see]

interview

[in′tərvyo̅o̅]
a verbal interaction with a patient initiated for a specific purpose and focused on a specific content area. A problem-seeking interview is an inquiry that focuses on gathering data to identify problems the patient needs to resolve. A problem-solving interview focuses on problems that have been identified by the patient or health care professional.

Patient discussion about interview

Q. I need to do an interview with someone with knowledge on lupus for a research paper any takers? a couple of questions should do it. it doesn't have to be extensive.

A. I HAVE SLE AND A FUW MORE THANS THAT ARE KNOW TO BE KNOW TO COME FROM HAVEING SLE LUPUS I AM NOT 100% OF ALL THAT COMES WITH SLE BUT I AM WILLING TO TELL U ALL I KNOW THANK YOU

More discussions about interview
References in periodicals archive ?
The researcher interviewed the caretakers within two weeks of them being asked to participate.
All interviewed instructors predicted that more integration of multimedia would be a future development for online courses.
Without exception, the parents or guardians interviewed wanted their children to do well in life.
Assume Holmes has interviewed the purchasing agent and still doubts his truthfulness.
Eight graduates were eligible and invited to participate via a cover letter (e-mail or postal mail); ultimately four were interviewed.
When interviewed, people who answer in the affirmative should have congruent head movement supporting what they say.
However, if I'm being interviewed by a reporter, I don't consider anything 'off the record.
Finally, the students who interviewed World War 11 conscientious objectors discovered alternative narratives of patriotism and forms of citizenship that will shape their interactions with local, regional, and national communities.
Vulnerable qualities should not exclude suspects from being interviewed.