intervention

(redirected from intervention strategy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

intervention

 [in″ter-ven´shun]
interposition or interference in the affairs of another to accomplish a goal or end; see also implementation.
crisis intervention
1. counseling or psychotherapy for patients in a life crisis that is directed at supporting the patient through the crisis and helping the patient cope with the stressful event that precipitated it.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as use of short-term counseling to help the patient cope with a crisis and resume a state of functioning comparable to or better than the pre-crisis state.
nursing intervention an action for which nurses are responsible that is intended to benefit a patient or client.
percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) the management of coronary artery occlusion by any of various catheter-based techniques, such as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, atherectomy, angioplasty using the excimer laser, and implantation of coronary stents and related devices.
intervention (omaha) in the omaha system, an action or activity undertaken to address a specific client problem and to improve, maintain, or restore health or to prevent illness. See also intervention scheme.

in·ter·ven·tion

(in'tĕr-ven'shŭn),
An action or ministration that produces an effect or is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process.
[L. inter-ventio, a coming between, fr inter-venio, to come between]

intervention

(ĭn′tə-r-vĕn′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of intervening: a nation's military interventions in neighboring countries; a politician opposed to government intervention in the market economy.
2.
a. The systematic process of assessment and planning employed to remediate or prevent a social, educational, or developmental problem: early intervention for at-risk toddlers.
b. An act that alters the course of a disease, injury, or condition by initiating a treatment or performing a procedure or surgery.
c. A planned, often unannounced meeting with a person with a serious personal problem, such as addiction, in order to persuade the person to seek treatment.

intervention

EBM
Anything meant to change the course of events for a person: surgery, a drug, a test, a treatment, counseling, providing informational pamphlets.

Psychology
An application of therapeutic/educational techniques to modify a person’s performance in a designated area of communication—e.g., expressive language, attention, etc.

Public health
An act or procedure capable of reducing injury or improving health.

Surgery
An operation.

Vox populi
Intercession in the acts of others to prevent an adverse outcome.

intervention

Public health A device or procedure capable of ↓ injuries. See Administrative intervention, Behavioral intervention, Crisis intervention, Health intervention Surgery An operation. See Routine intervention, Motivational intervention, Percutaneous intervention, Pharmacist intervention, Remedial intervention.

in·ter·ven·tion

(in'tĕr-ven'shŭn)
1. An action or ministration that produces an effect or that is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process.
2. biowarfare Any action, ministration, or device intended to prevent or alter the course of deliberate release of a mass-casualty agent.
Synonym(s): countermeasure.
3. Synonym(s): implementation. See also: absorption
[L. inter-ventio, a coming between, fr inter-venio, to come between]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mothers were provided with a package of 8 brightly colored, laminated cards, each with the name of one clinical intervention strategy. They were asked to sort the cards in order from their most preferred to their least preferred method.
Most mothers in the study identified specific advantages for this clinical intervention strategy. The leading categories identified from their positive responses were help with questions and problems; the preference for private, personal communication; overall increased learning; and competency of the nurse for infant assessments.
Many of the mothers in the study reported advantages to this intervention strategy. Their most frequent positive responses were categorized as receiving helpful child care information/advice, competency and experience of the lay worker, and an opportunity to increase their social network.
Many mothers in this study cited specific advantages to this very popular clinical intervention strategy. Their perceptions of the advantages to using classes in the clinic as a method for promoting infant health demonstrated consistency, as most were placed in one of two categories: helpful content about infant health promotion and the opportunity to ask questions.
Many mothers voiced a positive reaction to the use of a health diary as a clinical intervention strategy to promote infant health.
The final intervention strategy, self-sustaining economic development, focuses on collective economic development, a situation in which the whole of community activities exceeds the sum of specific interests.
Quantity or scope: Mission help to develop an intervention strategy for condominiums Val Fourre under the foreshadowing of a ORCOD-IN to Mantes-la-Jolie (78)
Reflecting on the progress in developing the Governments Intervention Strategy, Minister White said When I came into office, I set challenging milestones for the delivery of this project.
This contract is for the achievement of territorial and thematic ad hoc support to the water agency Rhone Mediterranean Corsica to boost its intervention strategy on aquatic environments (rivers and wetlands) in the circumstances set by the CCTP.
Contract notice: Pre-operational study for the definition of an intervention strategy on the private housing park old historic center of nantes.
In this project we will develop and evaluate an innovative intervention strategy to improve pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment for cardiovascular disease in elderly patients.
This flexible internet-based intervention strategy can be easily translated and adapted for use in different health-care systems in the EU.

Full browser ?