intervention

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intervention

 [in″ter-ven´shun]
interposition or interference in the affairs of another to accomplish a goal or end; see also implementation.
crisis intervention
1. counseling or psychotherapy for patients in a life crisis that is directed at supporting the patient through the crisis and helping the patient cope with the stressful event that precipitated it.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as use of short-term counseling to help the patient cope with a crisis and resume a state of functioning comparable to or better than the pre-crisis state.
nursing intervention an action for which nurses are responsible that is intended to benefit a patient or client.
percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) the management of coronary artery occlusion by any of various catheter-based techniques, such as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, atherectomy, angioplasty using the excimer laser, and implantation of coronary stents and related devices.
intervention (omaha) in the omaha system, an action or activity undertaken to address a specific client problem and to improve, maintain, or restore health or to prevent illness. See also intervention scheme.

in·ter·ven·tion

(in'tĕr-ven'shŭn),
An action or ministration that produces an effect or is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process.
[L. inter-ventio, a coming between, fr inter-venio, to come between]

intervention

(ĭn′tə-r-vĕn′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of intervening: a nation's military interventions in neighboring countries; a politician opposed to government intervention in the market economy.
2.
a. The systematic process of assessment and planning employed to remediate or prevent a social, educational, or developmental problem: early intervention for at-risk toddlers.
b. An act that alters the course of a disease, injury, or condition by initiating a treatment or performing a procedure or surgery.
c. A planned, often unannounced meeting with a person with a serious personal problem, such as addiction, in order to persuade the person to seek treatment.

intervention

EBM
Anything meant to change the course of events for a person: surgery, a drug, a test, a treatment, counseling, providing informational pamphlets.

Psychology
An application of therapeutic/educational techniques to modify a person’s performance in a designated area of communication—e.g., expressive language, attention, etc.

Public health
An act or procedure capable of reducing injury or improving health.

Surgery
An operation.

Vox populi
Intercession in the acts of others to prevent an adverse outcome.

intervention

Public health A device or procedure capable of ↓ injuries. See Administrative intervention, Behavioral intervention, Crisis intervention, Health intervention Surgery An operation. See Routine intervention, Motivational intervention, Percutaneous intervention, Pharmacist intervention, Remedial intervention.

in·ter·ven·tion

(in'tĕr-ven'shŭn)
1. An action or ministration that produces an effect or that is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process.
2. biowarfare Any action, ministration, or device intended to prevent or alter the course of deliberate release of a mass-casualty agent.
Synonym(s): countermeasure.
3. Synonym(s): implementation. See also: absorption
[L. inter-ventio, a coming between, fr inter-venio, to come between]
References in periodicals archive ?
The dependence of performance on an intervening event between T1 and T2 makes it tempting to conclude that similar mechanisms underlie performance in this task and in spatial orienting tasks.
If after intervening you honestly believe your knowledge, credibility, and authority are not relevant to the conflict, your job is to find someone who is relevant to mediate.
Future investigations should control for intervening variables such as class size and amount of instructors' experience with teaching via WebCT.
The presence of intervening sediments in the core that Keller studied is a testament to the chaotic environment within the Chicxulub crater just after the impact occurred, he proposes.
Rather than asking the United States to intervene to fix the problems it exacerbated by intervening in the first place, it would be better to break this vicious circle and adopt a less interventionist American foreign policy.
When a nation's government is abusing human rights against popular opinion, then one can no longer claim "cultural differences." In addition, the intervening nation's people should support the action.
When officers are killed in the line of duty, there may be a tendency to assume that they died while intervening in felonies, transporting prisoners, or engaging in other police duties that involve them with clearly antagonistic individuals.
"In another 5 months, if there's no intervening recession, we'll have the longest economic expansion since recording began in 1854," he said.
'Intervening with History', the first major North American exhibition of Scarpa's work currently at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal, explores the idea of architecture as a record of cultural continuity.
Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin stated, "We welcome Prime Minister Hashimoto's announcement of steps to stimulate the Japanese economy," and noted that "what is crucial is that Japan move quickly to put in place a strong program." He also said that "we share the concern expressed by the Japanese Prime Minister about recent weakness in the yen, and in that context we welcome the action undertaken by the Japanese authorities in the exchange market to support the value of the yen." On April 10 the yen appreciated to [yen] 127.38 amid reports that the Japanese monetary authorities were intervening heavily in Asian foreign exchange markets.
When should you infer that the causes are linked directly to the effects, and when should you infer that causes are linked to effects by passing through intervening variables?
He claims First Deputy Norman Steisel confirmed that suspicion when he told Zuckerman "intervening events" had prompted the city's decision.