interstitial

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interstitial

 [in″ter-stish´al]
pertaining to or situated between parts or in the interstices of a tissue.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ter·sti·tial

(in'tĕr-stish'ăl),
1. Relating to spaces or interstices in any structure.
2. Relating to spaces within a tissue or organ, but excluding such spaces as body cavities or potential space. Compare: intracavitary.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

interstitial

(ĭn′tər-stĭsh′əl)
adj.
1. Relating to, occurring in, or affecting interstices.
2. Anatomy Relating to or situated in the small, narrow spaces between tissues or parts of an organ: interstitial cells; interstitial fluid.

in′ter·sti′tial·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

interstitial

adjective Referring to or occurring in the interstitium of a tissue.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ter·sti·tial

(in'tĕr-stish'ăl)
1. Relating to spaces or interstices in any structure.
2. Relating to spaces within a tissue or organ, but excluding such spaces as body cavities or potential space.
Compare: intracavitary
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

interstitial

Pertaining to, or existing in, INTERSTICES.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Interstitial

Refers to the connective tissue that supports the "working parts" of an organ, in the case of the lungs the air sacs.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ter·sti·tial

(in'tĕr-stish'ăl)
Relating to spaces or interstices in any structure.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The first one is the assumptions that cation ions of oxides, such as [Pb.sup.2+] in PBs, enter interstitially as a result of the addition of oxides, such as PbO, into the borate glass networks.
All of the dopant ions are smaller than the host [Cd.sup.+2] or [Zn.sup.+2] ions except [Mn.sup.+2] relative to [Zn.sup.+2], suggesting that, at this slightly large doping ratio (10%), the dopant metal ion enters to the lattice substitutionary interstitially leading to increasing the interplaner spacing (d) values (see Tables 1 and 2)[53].
These findings suggest that N atoms would not chemically react to produce new crystalline structures, such as TiN, but are rather incorporated interstitially and substitutionally into the Ti[O.sub.2] structure [15].
(5,6) Lymphoid follicles tend to extend interstitially between collagen bundles and into septa of the subcutis and often have many plasma cells at their peripheries.
pylori penetrates nonmetaplastic, metaplastic, and neoplastic gastric epithelium both intracellularly and interstitially. (52) Residing and replicating within gastric cells have significant implications for antimicrobial treatment as antimicrobials may fail to penetrate gastric cells.
In the course of deciding the case before him he may, on occasion, develop the common law in the perceived interests of justice, though as a general rule he does this 'only interstitially,' [that is, by filling in gaps] to use the expression of O W Holmes] in Southern Pacific Co v Jensen (1917) 244 US 205, 221.
Interstitially, the plurality of qimmiit takes shape as a missing membership, one that does not form fighting lines against so much as what Deleuze and Guattari term "lines of flight" away from lives that in quantity and quality became diminished by permanent settlement.
The analysis using Ag-NOR technique showed only a single mark, interstitially located in the short arms of the second M pair, in all metaphases (Figure 1, box).
and explanatory comments that appear interstitially among the new code
In examining this issue, the Court contrasted the "Blackstonian view" with that of the positivist John Austin, who "maintained that judges do in fact do something more than discover law; they make it interstitially by filling in with judicial interpretation [the terms of the law] that alone are but the empty crevices of the law." (41) The consequence of the view that judges make law, rather than merely "discover" it, is that new interpretations do not "erase[]" previous decisions, which are considered "existing juridical fact[s]," that "are not to be disturbed." (42) While the Court did not explicitly adopt the Austinian position, it employed it as a counter-example to Blackstone to help demonstrate that its adoption of nonretroactivity had some theoretical support.
forum court's law interstitially as a matter of judicial