interstitial

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Related to interstitial fluid pressure: Colloid osmotic pressure

interstitial

 [in″ter-stish´al]
pertaining to or situated between parts or in the interstices of a tissue.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ter·sti·tial

(in'tĕr-stish'ăl),
1. Relating to spaces or interstices in any structure.
2. Relating to spaces within a tissue or organ, but excluding such spaces as body cavities or potential space. Compare: intracavitary.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

interstitial

(ĭn′tər-stĭsh′əl)
adj.
1. Relating to, occurring in, or affecting interstices.
2. Anatomy Relating to or situated in the small, narrow spaces between tissues or parts of an organ: interstitial cells; interstitial fluid.

in′ter·sti′tial·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

interstitial

adjective Referring to or occurring in the interstitium of a tissue.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ter·sti·tial

(in'tĕr-stish'ăl)
1. Relating to spaces or interstices in any structure.
2. Relating to spaces within a tissue or organ, but excluding such spaces as body cavities or potential space.
Compare: intracavitary
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

interstitial

Pertaining to, or existing in, INTERSTICES.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Interstitial

Refers to the connective tissue that supports the "working parts" of an organ, in the case of the lungs the air sacs.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ter·sti·tial

(in'tĕr-stish'ăl)
Relating to spaces or interstices in any structure.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
k ([cm.sup.2] [mm.sup.-1] H[g.sup.-1] [s.sup.-1]), Pi (mm [Hg.sup.-1]) and u (m [s.sup.-1]) are the hydraulic conductivity of the interstitium, the interstitial fluid pressure and the interstitial fluid velocity respectively (the Nomenclatures are listed in Appendix 1).
Starling's forces The hydrostatic pressures that determine whether fluid moves out of the blood into the interstitium or the opposite direction: capillary pressure, interstitial fluid pressure, plasma colloid osmotic pressure and interstitial colloid osmotic pressure.
We suggest a physiological explanation for residual-limb fluid loss over time: while a person wears a prosthesis, unless the socket is very loose, interface pressures induce interstitial fluid pressures that put residual-limb fluid transport out of balance.
Because of the continual stress applied by the prosthetic socket on the residual limb during standing and walking and thus the increase in interstitial fluid pressure, people with limb amputation would be expected to undergo limb fluid volume decreases over time, not increases.
Because of the quite low permeability of cartilage (in the range (1.2-6.2) x [10.sup.-16] [m.sup.4]/Ns for all types of cartilage materials) [11], large interstitial fluid pressures and dissipations occur in the tissue during loading.

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