interstitial emphysema


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Related to interstitial emphysema: compensatory emphysema

in·ter·sti·tial em·phy·se·ma

1. presence of air in the pulmonary tissues consequent upon rupture of the air cells;
2. presence of air or gas in the connective tissue.

interstitial emphysema

a form of emphysema in which air or gas escapes into the interstitial tissues of the lung after a penetrating injury or a rupture in an alveolar wall. Because the alveoli must be decompressed, there is danger that the pleura will be torn, causing a pneumothorax. The condition is diagnosed by chest x-ray films. See also pneumothorax.

in·ter·sti·tial em·phy·se·ma

(in'tĕr-stish'ăl em'fi-sē'mă)
1. Presence of air in the pulmonary tissues consequent upon rupture of the air cells.
2. Presence of air or gas in the connective tissue.

emphysema

a pathological accumulation of air in tissues. The air may derive from a skin laceration and be drawn in by the movements of muscles. A discontinuity of the tracheal mucosa is a common cause, either by way of laceration or ulceration. Extension from a pulmonary lesion is also common. The syndrome resulting depends on the location of the air. See also pulmonary emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema (below).

acute bovine pulmonary emphysema
alveolar emphysema
see pulmonary emphysema (below).
bullous emphysema
emphysema in which bullae form in areas of lung tissue so that these areas do not contribute to respiration.
conjunctival emphysema
may occur after head trauma which permits escape of air from the paranasal sinuses.
fetal emphysema
see emphysematous/putrescent fetus.
generalized emphysema
widespread distribution of air, including subcutaneous tissues, seen with pneumomediastinum.
hypoplastic emphysema
pulmonary emphysema due to a developmental abnormality, resulting in a reduced number of alveoli, which are abnormally large.
interlobular emphysema
accumulation of air in the septa between lobules of the lungs.
interstitial emphysema
presence of air in the peribronchial and interstitial tissues of the lungs.
intestinal emphysema
a condition marked by accumulation of gas under the tunica serosa of the intestine.
lobar emphysema
emphysema involving less than all the lobes of the affected lung.
mediastinal emphysema
orbital emphysema
may occur after trauma to the head which permits escape of air from the paranasal sinuses; appears as swelling with crepitus under the conjunctiva or periocular skin.
panacinar emphysema, panlobular emphysema
generalized obstructive emphysema affecting all lung segments, with atrophy and dilatation of the alveoli and destruction of the vascular bed.
pulmonary emphysema
distention of the lung caused by overdistention of alveoli and rupture of alveolar walls (alveolar emphysema) and in some cases escape of air into the interstitial spaces (interstitial emphysema). It is a common pathological finding in many diseases of the lung in all species, but also occurs independently, especially in horses, as a principal lesion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is also a prominent lesion in bovine atypical interstitial pneumonia. It is always secondary to a primary lesion which effectively traps an excessive amount of air in the alveoli. It is characterized clinically by cough, dyspnea, forced expiratory effort and poor work tolerance. A double expiratory effort is a characteristic sign—hence broken wind.
subconjunctival emphysema
occurs with fractures involving the paranasal sinuses.
subcutaneous emphysema
air or gas in the subcutaneous tissues. The characteristic lesion is a soft, mobile swelling which crackles like stiff paper when palpated. There is no pain, nor heat and no ill effects unless the pharyngeal area is sufficiently involved to cause asphyxia.
surgical emphysema
subcutaneous emphysema following operation.
unilateral emphysema
emphysema affecting only one lung, frequently due to congenital defects in circulation.
vesicular emphysema
see panacinar emphysema (above).

interstitial

pertaining to or situated between parts or in the interspaces of a tissue.

atypical interstitial pneumonia
interstitial cell adenoma
see interstitial cell tumor (below).
interstitial cell-stimulating hormone
luteinizing hormone.
interstitial cell
the cells of the connective tissue of the ovary or the testis (Leydig's cells), which furnish the internal secretion of those structures.
interstitial cell tumor
a common testicular tumor in old dogs. Most are benign and not associated with any major clinical disturbances but there may be concurrent perianal gland neoplasms, infertility and rarely feminization or viciousness. Called also Leydig cell tumor or interstitial cell adenoma.
interstitial edema
edema of the interstitial interlobular tissue in the lung.
interstitial emphysema
pulmonary emphysema with air accumulated in the interlobular connective tissue; characteristic of emphysema in cattle.
interstitial fluid
the extracellular fluid bathing cells in most tissues, excluding the fluid within the lymph and blood vessels.
interstitial gland
of the ovary, consisting of polyhedral epithelioid cells in the stroma of the ovary and have characteristics of cells which produce steroids.
interstitial nephritis
interstitial fluid pressure
pressure exerted by the free interstitial fluid; if the pressure is negative this tends to suck fluid out of the vascular system and into the tissue space; if the pressure is greater than the intravascular pressure fluid tends to move out of the tissue space.
interstitial pneumonia
interstitial space
tissue space.
interstitial tissue
connective tissue between the cellular elements of a structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
vitulina) collected from July to December 2002 showed a moderate-to-severe pulmonary alveolar and interstitial emphysema and alveolar edema as the predominant findings.
1,14) In cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum during labor, it is believed that alveolar rupture secondary to a rapid increase in air pressure in the alveoli leads to pulmonary interstitial emphysema.
A computed tomography chest scan (Figure 1) showed extensive surgical emphysema, perivascular and peribronchial emphysema which was consistent with a diagnosis of pulmonary interstitial emphysema.

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