intersectoral collaboration

intersectoral collaboration

(ĭn-tĕr-sĕk′tĕr-ĭl) [″ + sector]
Cooperation among different social groups that enables them to solve common problems, e.g., a public health crisis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Santa Fe province of Argentina, the Ministry of Health has identified intersectoral collaboration as a priority.
It underscored the need for a change in mind-set from the traditional preoccupation with combining the use of only a few limited vector control methods, such as LLINs and IRS, to a comprehensive strategy with key elements that include integration of chemical and nonchemical methods of vector control and their further integration with other aspects of a country's health-care system, evidence-based decision making, intersectoral collaboration, advocacy and social mobilization, and capacity building.
Approaches like Health in All Policies (HiAP) conceptualize the inclusion of SDH through intersectoral collaboration (Scott-Samuel, 2005).
There is a need for intersectoral collaboration, nationwide approach, and responsibility of local authorities in the issue of public health strengthening.
Examples of cases in psychiatry where intersectoral collaboration is central include: community-based residential and psycho-social rehabilitation facilities and services; forensic psychiatry; substance abuse and addiction; [31,32] child and adolescent psychiatry, and geriatric psychiatry.
His study of the Pakistani and Venezuelan health care systems found evidence that both intergovernmental and intersectoral collaboration are at play, despite the fact that both systems of government have historically leaned toward authoritarian principles.
Such lack of authority is also identified as a barrier to the effective intersectoral collaboration that is envisioned as critical to the NFP role within their national situation.
Strengthen partnerships and intersectoral collaboration.
The five principles of PHC are: accessibility; public participation; health promotion; appropriate technology; and intersectoral collaboration (CNA, 2000).
Good governance ** ensuring that information is collected from all public and private healthcare providers ** basing national health strategies on health information systems that monitor an agreed number of indicators used by all partners ** developing national performance monitoring tools to track progress towards health goals ** monitoring health equity by the application of socio-economic and living standards households surveys ** strengthening intersectoral collaboration and coordination to develop and govern national health information system policies 3.
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