interrogatory


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interrogatory

(ĭn″tĕr-rŏg′ă-tor″ē)
In law, a written question sent by one party to another requesting information about issues, facts, backgrounds, and witnesses surrounding the allegations in a lawsuit.
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parties' original intent in positing the special interrogatory to
interrogatory contained in the Appendix to these Rules shall count as a
(44) Furthermore, if the responding party declares that it does not waive any objection by answering an interrogatory, this is insufficient to preserve objections not specifically set forth in the response.
In an expert interrogatory, a party may inquire as to the identity of each witness expected to be called at trial.
Section 1446(b) does not define "other paper." Interrogatory answers have generally been recognized as "other papers" sufficient to trigger the supplemental removal period.[17] Although some courts have interpreted this provision as applying only to papers actually filed in the case,[18] most have read it more expansively.
District courts do have the special interrogatory at their disposal.
And those who use the echoic interrogatory right should be sat on by a 600-lb.
"The RISP argue that this interrogatory is overly broad because Plaintiff has not specified a timeframe.
Minke issued interrogatories, specifically Interrogatory No.
On October 27, 2015, the Court allowed the motion to compel, and ordered the plaintiffs to serve their interrogatory answers by October 29, 2015.
This is less of an issue in litigation, because if a scheduled event has not occurred, one can always check with opposing counsel, such as when interrogatory answers are due.
One interrogatory, which the hospital refused to respond to, and which is the heart of the case was an interrogatory in which the plaintiff requested the hospital to disclose how many patients had fallen from their beds during the three years preceding the decedent's fall from her bed.