question

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question

 [kwes´chun]
an utterance about something unknown, seeking knowledge or other response.
research question an interrogative phrase focused on what is to be described by a given research project and what relationships may be established.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Queries that have been rewritten get better results, including queries of "N + V" and of interrogative sentence.
Third person imperative marking is also found in interrogative sentences with 1st or 2nd person addressees, but most of the attested examples are indirect (embedded) interrogatives; cf.
It's an important fact--a fact central to their very nature--that interrogative sentences are typically used to ask.
Karbordsenasi-ye jomle-ha-ye porsesi dar zaban-e farsi [The pragmatics of interrogative sentences in Persian].
An example would be the role of enclitic li in interrogative sentences of Russian and other Slavic languages, not to mention the role of clausal typing particles in numerous East and South East Asian languages.
Fathers and mothers were found to be similar in the number of verbs employed; in the proportion of verbs, modifiers, and pronouns used; and in the frequency of declarative and interrogative sentences directed to children (Golinkoff & Ames, 1979; Hummell, 1982; Kavanaugh & Jen, 1981; Lewis & Gregory, 1987).
The verb was also found in interrogative sentences, both direct and dependent ones:
Hence in this essay I foreground the structural and epistemological role of interrogative sentences in Rossetti's poetry and argue that they are fundamental to his poetic practice.
Though Gold Fools consists entirely of interrogative sentences, the plot is surprisingly clear.
Exclamation note in network texts has certain features, this punctuation mark is often used in interrogative sentences, and when combined with a comma after the interjections "cool", "thanks" and "well" it denotes agreement, reflection or concession.
Errors in the use of 'do' were further classified into 'over use' and 'under use' of 'do' in affirmative, negative and interrogative sentences.
Eliza [9] is a psychotherapeutic counselling system that converts user's utterances into interrogative sentences or makes non-substantive responses, such as "Really?