interrogate

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interrogate

(in-te′rŏ-gāt″) [L. interrogare, to ask, question, inquire]
1. To question someone carefully and thoroughly, esp. someone involved in a legal proceeding.
2. To extract data accumulated in the memory of a medical device, e.g., a pacemaker.
interrogation (-ter″ŏ-gā′shŏn)
References in periodicals archive ?
Like interrogational torture [and, presumably, other torture as well], ordeals involve not just an insult or injury to the victim's agency.
While I think he has a tendency to write as though his concern is only with interrogational torture, especially near the end of the paper, his opening paragraphs make clear his subject is torture as such.
Exactly at what point an interrogational environment crosses the line between tolerable and intolerable is individually defined.
Because a psychologist is relying on the suspect's statements during a clinical examination conducted weeks or months after the interrogation, he or she is in no position to make an accurate determination of the suspect's ability to tolerate the interrogational environment.
Part IV examines how increased efforts to prevent terrorist attacks and eradicate terrorist networks have made interrogational torture a more expedient option than it used to be.
64) The emphasis placed on gathering this information raises the question of whether the United States would ever engage in or condone interrogational torture to pry information out of recalcitrant detainees.
80) This implementation of the Convention Against Torture raises concerns about its efficacy and ability to prevent extraordinary renditions undertaken to facilitate interrogational torture.
155) In this context, preventive interrogational torture is portrayed as almost pragmatic and humanitarian, rather than simply barbaric and authoritarian.
This need for information explains why the incentive to engage in or condone interrogational torture has increased with the growing struggle against terrorism.
Maher Arar's story (163) presents a specific example of how the United States might profit from interrogational torture while apparently complying with its implementation of the Convention Against Torture.
176) Unfortunately, the political pressures on the executive branch have apparently encouraged a belief in the merits of interrogational torture.
To address the issue of torture in the context of extraordinary renditions, the United States government needs to reinforce its implementation of the international norms against state-sponsored torture through legislation that openly ventilates the issue of interrogational torture.