interrogate

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interrogate

(in-te′rŏ-gāt″) [L. interrogare, to ask, question, inquire]
1. To question someone carefully and thoroughly, esp. someone involved in a legal proceeding.
2. To extract data accumulated in the memory of a medical device, e.g., a pacemaker.
interrogation (-ter″ŏ-gā′shŏn)
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References in periodicals archive ?
stated, if an interrogation is not taped, an objective assessment of the
Next, he retells the well-known story of executive branch lawyers enabling "enhanced" interrogation techniques (EITs).
The CIA outsourced the work to two firms, with psychologists paid large fees (up to $1,800 a session) for the interrogation. With such large financial remuneration, it was not surprising that these psychologists and the CIA operatives involved all reported favorable results from the interrogation.
1) The use of enhanced interrogation techniques was not an effective means of acquiring intelligence
Zubaida "cried," "begged," "pleaded" and "whimpered," but the waterboarding continued and the interrogation progressed.
CIA officials often gave inaccurate information about its interrogation program to Bush administration White House and legal officials, preventing a proper legal analysis of the prison operations.
"The use of the CIA's enhanced interrogation techniques was not an effective means of obtaining accurate information," according to the Senate Intelligence Committee report.
Human rights groups and several foreign governments say the CIA programme -- known internally as the Rendition, Detention and Interrogation -- included torture.
The findings, leaked to McClatchy by unidentified sources, call into sharp question the administration's legal foundation for the CIA's use of harsh interrogation techniques.
"Then he was moved to an interrogation facility in Megiddo (the "stool pigeons" room) for further investigation because he wouldn't admit to the charges at Jalameh.
Yes, some of it came from some of the tactics that were used at that time, interrogation tactics that were used."
But in the wake of a handful of exonerations involving false confessions, defense attorneys and other advocates worry that without a recording of the entire interrogation, they may never know how a false confession occurred.