interpreter

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interpreter

(in-ter'pret-er)
One who provides an oral translation for people who do not speak the same language, or a machine that performs the same function.

Patient care

The Joint Commission recommends that access to competent, culturally sensitive interpreters be a standard of care for everyone seeking health care.

Synonym: translator (2)
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [Word-for-word translation: Bone and flesh's closeness, separated but not disconnected.] Interpreted version: We are compatriots and I believe brothers, though geographically apart will always be bound by their blood ties.
In that same vein, these individuals have routinely been interpreted as evidence for existing prehistoric social structures that called upon members of a group to support one another.
Jim interpreted the equation as a representation for the slack rope board.
The four types of providers did not differ in how well they interpreted the skin test reaction.
If your CT examination result is interpreted as normal, either
The range of things interpreted is unlimited, including not only events and human characters but mysterious figures like the three traveling males and the lady in the yard with a basket (102), as well as the Cross, dreams, and potential signs.
"I see it as my job to make certain that the statistical methodology utilized in these new models is appropriate and that the data are correctly evaluated and interpreted."
Another observed that the terms "irritant" and "contaminant" in the clause are so broad that, if the clause were interpreted literally, it would extend "far beyond its intended scope" and lead to "absurd results" - excluding, for instance, injury suffered by someone who slips and falls on the spilled contents of a bottle of Drano, or has an allergic reaction to the chlorine in a public pool.
For the years at issue, the code and regulations--as interpreted by published revenue rulings--were ambiguous.
"One court gave a narrow interpretation of the law in one state, and another interpreted its state law differently."
Information is interpreted to create what Bruner calls "products of mind." This mysterious capacity to interpret and create is at the core of what it means to be human.

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