complex

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complex

 [kom´pleks]
1. the sum, combination, or collection of various things or related factors, like or unlike; e.g., a complex of symptoms (see syndrome).
2. a group of interrelated ideas, mainly unconscious, that have a common emotional tone and strongly influence a person's attitudes and behavior.
3. that portion of an electrocardiographic tracing which represents the systole of an atrium or ventricle.
AIDS-related complex (ARC) a complex of signs and symptoms occurring in HIV infection including fever, weight loss, prolonged diarrhea, minor opportunistic infections, lymphadenopathy, and changes in cells of the immune system.
antigen-antibody complex here the complex formed by the noncovalent binding of an antibody and antigen. Complexes of antibodies belonging to certain immunoglobulin classes may activate complement. Called also immune complex.
anti-inhibitor coagulant complex (AICC) a concentrated fraction from pooled human plasma, which includes various coagulation factors. It is administered intravenously as an antihemorrhagic in hemophilic patients with inhibitors to coagulation factor VIII.
atrial complex the P wave of the electrocardiogram, representing electrical activity of the atria. See also ventricular complex.
castration complex in psychoanalytic theory, unconscious thoughts and motives stemming from fear of loss of the genitals as punishment for forbidden sexual desires.
Electra complex libidinous fixation of a daughter toward her father. This term is rarely used, since oedipus complex is generally applied to both sexes.
factor IX complex a sterile, freeze-dried powder consisting of partially purified coagulation factor IX fraction, as well as concentrated factor II, VII, and X fractions, of venous plasma from healthy human donors. It is used in the prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding in patients with hemophilia B, replacement of factor VII in patients deficient in that factor, and treatment of anticoagulant-induced hemorrhage. Administered intravenously.
Ghon complex primary complex (def. 1).
Golgi complex golgi apparatus.
HLA complex the human major histocompatibility complex, which contains the hla antigens.
immune complex antigen-antibody complex.
inclusion complex one in which molecules of one type are enclosed within cavities in the crystalline lattice of another substance.
inferiority complex unconscious feelings of inadequacy, producing shyness or timidity or, as a compensation, exaggerated agressiveness and expression of superiority; based on Alfred Adler's concept that everyone is born with a feeling of inferiority stemming from real or imagined physical or psychological deficiency, with the manner in which the inferiority is handled determining behavior.
interpolated premature ventricular complex a premature ventricular complex that does not interfere with the conduction of the next sinus beat, i.e., it lacks the usual following compensatory pause.
major histocompatibility complex (MHC) the chromosomal region containing genes that control the histocompatibility antigens; in humans it controls the hla antigens.
membrane attack complex (MAC) C5b,6,7,8,9, the five-molecule complex that is the cytolytic agent of the complement system.
Oedipus complex see oedipus complex.
primary complex
1. the combination of a parenchymal pulmonary lesion (Ghon focus) and a corresponding lymph node focus, occurring in primary tuberculosis, usually in children. Similar lesions may also be associated with other mycobacterial infections and with fungal infections.
2. the primary cutaneous lesion at the site of infection in the skin, e.g., chancre in syphilis and tuberculous chancre.
QRS complex a group of waves seen on an electrocardiogram, representing ventricular depolarization. Called also QRS wave. It actually consists of three distinct waves created by the passage of the cardiac electrical impulse through the ventricles and occurs at the beginning of each ventricular contraction. In a normal surface electrocardiogram the R wave is the upward deflection; the first downward deflection represents a Q wave and the final downward deflection is the S wave. The Q and S waves may be extremely weak and sometimes are absent.

One abnormality of the QRS complex is increased voltage resulting from enlargement of heart muscle, which produces increased quantities of electric current. A low-voltage QRS complex may result from toxic conditions of the heart, most commonly from fluid in the pericardium. Pleural effusion and emphysema also can cause a decrease in the voltage of the QRS complex.
VATER complex an association of congenital anomalies consisting of vertebral defects, imperforate anus, tracheoesophageal fistula, and radial and renal dysplasia.
ventricular complex the Q, R, S, and T waves of the electrocardiogram, representing ventricular electrical activity. See also atrial complex.

com·plex

(kom'pleks),
1. An organized constellation of feelings, thoughts, perceptions, and memories that may be in part unconscious and may strongly influence associations and attitudes.
2. In jungian psychology, a personification of an archetype from the collective unconscious, residing in the personal unconscious.
3. chemistry the relatively stable combination of two or more compounds into a larger molecule without covalent binding.
4. A composite of chemical or immunologic structures.
5. A structural anatomic entity made up of three or more interrelated parts.
6. In electroencephalography, a recognizable series of waveforms that typically recur at intervals.
7. An informal term used to denote a group of individual structures known or believed to be related anatomically, embryologically, or physiologically.
8. Synonym(s): sequence
[L. complexus, woven together]

complex

(kəm-plĕks′, kŏm′plĕks′)
adj.
1.
a. Consisting of interconnected or interwoven parts; composite: complex equipment with multiple components.
b. Composed of two or more units: a complex carbohydrate.
2. Difficult to understand for being intricate or involved; complicated: a complex problem.
n. (kŏm′plĕks′)
1. In psychoanalysis, a group of related, often repressed ideas and impulses that compel characteristic or habitual patterns of thought, feelings, and behavior.
2. An exaggerated or obsessive concern or fear: has a complex about his weight.
3. Medicine The combination of factors, symptoms, or signs of a disease or disorder that forms a syndrome.

com·plex′ly adv.
com·plex′ness n.

complex

adjective Complicated, not simple Medtalk A bunch of related stuff. See Activated complex, AIDS dementia complex, AIDS-related complex, Antigen-antibody complex, B complex, Carney's complex, CHARGE complex, CREST complex, H-2 complex, HIV-associated cognitive motor complex, Immune complex, K complex, Lambda complex, Laryngeal complex, LBW complex, Lymphoid granular complex, MAIS complex, Medea complex, Membrane adaptor complex, Mycobacterium avium complex, Nasal complex, Oriental flush complex, Parachute valve complex, Polymyositis/dermatomyositis complex, QRS complex, Ribosomal-lamellar complex, Sarcoglycan complex, Sequestration complex, Sicca complex Psychiatry A group of associated ideas with common, strong emotional tone, which is largely unconscious and significantly influences attitudes and associations. See Cain complex, Diana complex, Electra complex, Faust complex, Giving up-given up complex, God complex, Icarus complex, Inferiority complex, Jocasta complex, Joseph complex, King Lear complex, Mother Superior complex, Oedipus complex, Phaedra complex, Pygmalion complex, Superiority complex.

com·plex

(kom'pleks, kŏm-pleks')
1. psychiatry An organized constellation of feelings, thoughts, perceptions, and memories that may be in part unconscious and may strongly influence associations and attitudes.
2. chemistry The relatively stable combination of two or more compounds into a larger molecule without covalent binding.
3. A composite of chemical or immunologic structures.
4. An anatomic structure made up of three or more interrelated parts.
5. An informal term used to denote a group of individual structures known or believed to be anatomically, embryologically, or physiologically related.
6. Atrial or ventricular systole as it appears on an electrocardiographic tracing.
[L. complexus, woven together]

complex

A psychoanalytic term defining a group of tendencies, with strong emotional associations, but which is socially unacceptable and therefore repressed—with dire consequences. Freudians lay great emphasis on the Oedipus complex, which is said to be based on the desire for sexual access to the mother and the wish to dispose of the father. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.

com·plex

(kom'pleks, kŏm-pleks')
1. A structural anatomic entity made up of three or more interrelated parts.
2. An informal term used to denote a group of individual structures known or believed to be related anatomically, embryologically, or physiologically.
[L. complexus, woven together]

Patient discussion about complex

Q. When is the best time to take vitamin B complex? I mean- after / before a meal? with what foods? etc.

A. vitamin B complex is acidic, you might want to take it right after meals. i tried taking it on an empty stomach and got a terrible nausea...

Q. I have an injury called CRPS (Complex Regional Pain Syndrome) I desparately need help. Had 4 surgeries-no help The pain is excruciating every second, in my left hand and arm,with no relief. I don't know where to go next or what to pursue. I've tried every pain med there is and steroidal injections and nerve stimulator implant in back, but nothing has worked. Can't believe the pain- keeps me up at night and is a killer every other second of the day. Can anyone help??? Any suggestions I may not have tried??? I am desparate for some relief. Thanks Joe

A. It really sounds like you are suffering a great deal. Have you seen a pain specialist? Have you ever tried any kinds of stronger pain medications such as narcotics? I am only suggesting them as your last option to handle pain because no one should suffer this high amount of pain. You should discuss this with you primary care physician. I would also suggest talking to someone about your level of stress, because all this pain can cause you anxiety and you may find it helpful to talk to a psychologist or psychiatrist, see if they can help with that. I don't have any suggestions about the neurological problem because it sounds like you have tried everything there is to offer.

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