internist

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internist

 [in-ter´nist]
a specialist in internal medicine.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·tern·ist

(in-ter'nist, in'ter-nist),
A physician trained in internal medicine.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

internist

(ĭn-tûr′nĭst)
n.
A physician specializing in internal medicine.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

internist

Medtalk A practitioner of general medicine is certified by the Am Board of Internal Medicine–ABIM, who has had 3 yrs of formal training in internal medicine. Cf Family practitioner, Intern.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·tern·ist

(in-tĕr'nist)
A physician trained in internal medicine.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

internist

(USA) a physician who specializes in the study and treatment of non-surgical diseases in adults. A specialist in internal medicine.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Personally, I wouldn't expect any internist to continue a medication that I started prescribing.
The finding that internists delivered more preventive services, however, "raises some questions about cost-effectiveness and value," he said.
The average wait time for an appointment with an internist is 48 days, which is five days shorter than last year, but the average wait for family medicine is 36 days, up seven days from the 2010 survey.
This combination of findings - that only about half of internists and family physicians would refer directly to a gynecologic oncologist, and about one-third of ob.gyns.
For internists, reimbursement concerns were at the top of the list (35%), followed by time (33%), and lack of psychiatric support (28%).
Salary equity among male and female internists in Pennsylvania.
Care Choices' Web site states that members must select a primary-care physician, and that physician could bean internist. Albert said the ACP-ASIM is concerned Care Choices is adjusting its policy for economic reasons.
BACKGROUND * The authors of previous studies have suggested that family physicians generate lower health care expenditures than internists. Explanations for this difference have not been explored.
On closer examination, diagnoses of Gulf War syndrome are often replaced by findings of depression, stress reactions, and related disturbances, reports a team led by internist Michael J.
In a study published in the June 1997 issue of Gastroenterology, diverticulitis patients treated by gastroenterologists experienced shorter hospital stays and a lower risk of readmission than patients treated by family practitioners or internists.
Internists, pediatricians, Ob-Gyns and psychiatrists - the primary care front line - have become managed care "gatekeepers," entrusted to absorb many of the responsibilities of the specialist and make fewer specialist referrals as a result.
The white papers address those aspects of managed care that are most objectionable to internists and their patients.