internal jugular vein


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in·ter·nal jug·u·lar vein

[TA]
main venous structure of the neck, formed as a continuation of the sigmoid sinus of the dura mater, contained within the carotid sheath as it descends the neck uniting, behind the sternoclavicular joint, with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
Synonym(s): vena jugularis interna [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·ter·nal jug·u·lar vein

(in-tĕr'năl jŭg'yū-lăr vān) [TA]
Main venous structure of the neck, formed as a continuation of the sigmoid sinus of the dura mater, contained within the carotid sheath as it descends the neck to unite, behind the sternoclavicular joint, with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

internal jugular vein

A large vein in the neck, it drains the skull, brain, and parts of the face and neck. It originates in the jugular foramen at the base of the skull and descends vertically (behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle) in the carotid sheath. At its base, the internal jugular vein merges with the subclavian vein behind the clavicle to form the brachiocephalic vein.

The internal jugular vein is forms in the base of the skull by the merger of the inferior petrosal and sigmoid sinuses. As the vein descends through the neck, tributary veins include the facial, lingual, pharyngeal, superior thyroid, and middle thyroid veins.

The right internal jugular vein is often the blood vessel used for medical access to the central venous circulation and to the right side of the heart.

See also: vein
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of results of placement of cuffed-tunneled hemodialysis catheter in internal jugular vein with subclavian vein for long-term dialysis.
The internal jugular vein is the largest vein of the head and neck and it is a continuation of the sigmoid sinus which drains the intracranial and deep structures of the head and neck region (Standring et al.; Deepak et al., 2015).
Stany et al., "Ultrasound guided internal jugular vein access in children and infant: A meta-analysis of published studies," Pediatric Anesthesia, vol.
(a) There is complete occlusion of the right internal jugular vein (black arrow).
Findings on ultrasound include noncompressible low-level echos in the affected internal jugular vein associated with venous distention and absence of flow.
Murthy, "Unusual case of focal neck swelling: phlebectasia of internal jugular vein with intracranial extension," International Journal of Applied and Basic Medical Research, vol.
It shows the right and left internal jugular vein (RIJV and LIJV), right and left external jugular vein (REJV and LEJV), right and left supraclavicular (RSC and LSC) branches of cephalic vein, right and left cephalic vein (RCV and LCV), right and left infraclavicular (RIC and LIC) branch of cephalic vein, right and left axillary veins (RAV and LAV), right and left brachiocephalic vein (RBC and LBC), superior vena cava (SVC), aorta (A), deltoid muscle (D), and pectoral major muscle (P).
A bedside compression venous ultrasound of the right upper extremity that included the brachial veins, the axillary vein, the subclavian vein, and the internal jugular vein was performed revealing a distended, incompressible right subclavian vein which contained a visible intraluminal thrombus.
Pseudoaneurysm formation in the neck is a well-documented phenomenon after penetrating or blunt trauma to arteries, with most reported cases occurring in the carotids and usually preceded by internal jugular vein cannulation.
The mass laterally displaced the common carotid artery and internal jugular vein. The trachea was widened and compressed by the lesion (Figure 2).
FHCs should be reserved for cases where internal jugular vein catheterisation is unsuccessful or contraindicated, with catheter days restricted to a minimum.
Axial ultrasound images of patient revealing presence of intraluminal calcification (arrow) at level of bifurcation of left common carotid artery (a) without and (b) SCM: Sternocleidomastoid muscle; ICA: Internal carotid artery; ECA: External carotid artery; V: Internal jugular vein.

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