intermediate host

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Related to intermediate hosts: Secondary host

host

 [hōst]
1. an animal or plant that harbors and provides sustenance for another organism (the parasite).
2. the recipient of an organ or other tissue derived from another organism (the donor).
accidental host one that accidentally harbors an organism that is not ordinarily parasitic in the particular species.
definitive host (final host) a host in which a parasite attains sexual maturity.
intermediate host a host in which a parasite passes one or more of its asexual stages; usually designated first and second, if there is more than one.
paratenic host a potential or substitute intermediate host that serves until the appropriate definitive host is reached, and in which no development of the parasite occurs; it may or may not be necessary to the completion of the parasite's life cycle.
host of predilection the host preferred by a parasite.
primary host definitive host.
reservoir host an animal (or species) that is infected by a parasite, and which serves as a source of infection for humans or another species.
secondary host intermediate host.
transfer host one that is used until the appropriate definitive host is reached, but is not necessary to completion of the life cycle of the parasite.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ter·me·di·ate host

, intermediary host
1. one in which larval or developmental stages occur;
2. a host through which a microorganism can pass or which contains an asexual stage of a parasite.
Synonym(s): secondary host
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

intermediate host

n.
An organism in or on which a parasite develops to an adult but not sexually mature stage.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·ter·me·di·ate host

, intermediary host (in'tĕr-mē'dē-ăt hōst, in'tĕr-mē'dē-ar-ē)
1. One in which larval or developmental stages occur.
2. A host through which a microorganism can pass or contains an asexual stage of a parasite.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

intermediate host

any host upon which a parasite spends that part of its life cycle in which it is not sexually active.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Lymnaea palustris and Lymnaea fuscus are potential but uncommon intermediate hosts of Fasciola hepatica in Sweden.
Figure 1 summarizes the transmission of CE between the definitive and intermediate hosts.
This can be attributed to many factors, viz., exposure time to different intermediate hosts, increase in body length and immunity with advancement of age.
These non-Fasciola infections are caused by parasites whose other known intermediate hosts are nonlymnaeid snails, which in the Philippines include Pila luzonica, second intermediate host for Echinostoma ilocanum, and Oncomelania hupensis quadrasi, first intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum.
The wild rodent Akodon azarae (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) as intermediate host of Taenia taeniaeformis (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) on poultry farms of central Argentina.
Cystidicolid nematodes are frequently associated with precocious development, including continued growth of infective larvae to a relatively large size and advanced development of reproductive structures in the intermediate host (Smith and Lankester 1979; Anderson and Bartlett 1993; Anderson 2000).
Attempts to transmit the disease experimentally from infected oysters to naive oysters through proximity, feeding, injection, and tissue transplantation have all failed suggesting that there may be an intermediate host or hosts involved to complete the parasites lifecycle (Canzonier 1968, Canzonier 1974, Sunila et al.
magna including the biology of lymnaeid snail intermediate hosts. We then draw on current concepts in parasitology including coevolution, sublethal effects, coinfections, landscape ecology, and ecological interactions to inform management strategies concerning the habitat and parasitic relationships of F.
granulosus requires two host type, a definitive host and an intermediate host. Dogs are definitive hosts of the adult tapeworm and ruminants (Particularly sheep and goats) are intermediate hosts.
Gnathostoma nematodes are maintained in a zoonosis of regional mammalian host reservoirs and have complex life cycles with two intermediate hosts (Figure 1).

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