allele

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allele

 [ah-lēl´]
one of two or more alternative forms of a gene at the same site in a chromosome, which determine alternative characters in inheritance. adj., adj allel´ic.
silent allele one that produces no detectable effect.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·lele

(ă-lēl'), Avoid the mispronunciations al-ĕl' and al'ēl.
Any one of a series of two or more different genes that may occupy the same locus on a specific chromosome. As autosomal chromosomes are paired, each autosomal gene is represented twice in normal somatic cells. If the same allele occupies both units of the locus, the individual or cell is homozygous for this allele. If the alleles are different, the individual or cell is heterozygous for both alleles. See: DNA markers.
See also: dominance of traits.
Synonym(s): allelomorph
[G. allēlōn, reciprocally]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

allele

(ə-lēl′)
n.
Any of the alternative forms of a gene or other homologous DNA sequence. Also called allelomorph.

al·le′lic (ə-lē′lĭk, ə-lĕl′ĭk) adj.
al·le′lism n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

allele

One of two or more alternate form of a gene, which results in different gene products; any one of two or more variants of a gene that occupy the same position (locus) on a chromosome, which may differ in nucleotide sequence, but not substantively in function or effect.

In eukaryotic cells, alleles exist in pairs—usually one allele is contributed by each parent. The phenotypic expression of an allele is a function of whether the gene is dominant (in which case only one allele is needed for expression) or recessive (requiring that both alleles be the same for expression of a trait). Autosomal chromosomes are paired and each locus is represented twice; the presence of identical alleles on the same locus are said to be homozygous; the presence of two different alleles on the same locus are heterozygous.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

allele

Genetics An alternate form of a gene, which results in different gene products; any one of 2 or more variants of a gene that occupy the same position–locus on a chromosome, which may differ in nucleotide sequence, but not substantively in function or effect. See Amorphic allele, Pseudoallele allele, Reeler allele, Wimp allele.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

al·lele

(ă-lēl')
Any one of a series of two or more different genes that may occupy the same locus on a specific chromosome. As autosomal chromosomes are paired, each autosomal gene is represented twice in normal somatic cells. If the same allele occupies both units of the locus, the individual or cell is homozygous for this allele. If the alleles are different, the individual or cell is heterozygous for both alleles.
See also: DNA markers
Synonym(s): allelomorph.
[G. allēlōn, reciprocally]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

allele

Short for allelomorph.
1. Genes that occupy corresponding positions (HOMOLOGOUS loci) on homologous chromosomes. Humans have two, usually identical, alleles for each gene, one on each AUTOSOMAL chromosome of a pair.
2. One of the ways in which a gene, at a particular location on a chromosome, may differ in its DNA sequence from the normal or from its fellow at the corresponding location on the other chromosome. If different alleles of a gene occur at the corresponding sites on the pair of chromosomes the individual is said to be HETEROZYGOUS for the gene. If the two alleles are abnormal in the same way, the individual is HOMOZYGOUS and the characteristic determined by the gene defect will be present. Heterozygous individuals will show the features of the DOMINANT gene. The other allele is RECESSIVE. The term derives from the Greek allos , another.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

allele

a particular form of GENE. Alleles usually occur in pairs, one on each HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOME in a DIPLOID cell nucleus. When both alleles are the same the individual is described as being a HOMOZYGOTE; when each allele is different the individual is a HETEROZYGOTE. The number of allelic forms of a gene can be many (MULTIPLE ALLELISM), each form having a slightly different sequence of DNA bases but with the same overall structure. Each diploid can, however, carry only two alleles at one time. See also DOMINANCE (1).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

genotype

The complete genetic constitution of an individual at a particular location (locus) in the genome. At many locations (loci) throughout the genome, the chromosomal DNA sequence differs subtly between individuals. Each of the various DNA sequences at one locus is called an allele: for instance, if there are three sequence variants present, then there are three alleles. Offspring inherit one homologous chromosome from each parent. Thus, a genotype comprises two alleles: the allele inherited from the father (carried on the paternal chromosome) and the allele inherited from the mother (carried on the maternal chromosome). See gene; phenotype.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

al·lele

(ă-lēl')
Any one of a series of two or more different genes that may occupy the same locus on a specific chromosome.
[G. allēlōn, reciprocally]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
3) fell below the calculated [T.sub.m] cutoff of 88.2 [degrees]C separating intermediate alleles from expanded alleles, regardless of well position.
The results of the validation study indicate that the PCR-MCA assay is able to distinguish between most normal and intermediate alleles and can differentiate all normal and expanded HD alleles with no dropout of any of the expanded alleles tested, up to 99 CAG repeats.
Normal alleles had [T.sub.m]s [less than or equal to] 87.00 [degrees]C, intermediate alleles had [T.sub.m]s between 87.73 [degrees]C and 88.03 [degrees]C, and expanded alleles had [T.sub.m]s [greater than or equal to] 88.37 [degrees]C.
Fifteen large normal alleles (23-26 repeats) were misclassified as intermediate alleles, and 5 intermediate alleles were misclassified as expanded alleles with incomplete penetrance (see Fig.
The additive genetic variance ratio (AVR; [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 4C OMITTED]) for this pair of loci indicates that additive variance was suppressed at intermediate allele frequencies (AVR = 0.75 at generation zero).
The maximum additive genetic variance is approximately 1 1/2 times larger than the additive genetic variance at intermediate allele frequencies.
Again, given a parental population with intermediate allele frequencies, the change in additive genetic variance over the generations of genetic drift at varied population sizes is presented in Figure 6A.

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