intermarriage

(redirected from intermarry)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to intermarry: irreligious

in·ter·mar·riage

(in'tĕr-mar'ij),
1. Marriage of relatives.
2. Marriage of people of different races or cultures.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

intermarriage

(ĭn″tĕr-măr′ĭj) [″ + maritare, to marry]
1. Marriage between persons from two distinct populations.
2. Marriage between related individuals.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
If less-career-oriented Asians decide to intermarry, their labor market returns will be lower.
The lower panel of Table 4 pertaining to contextual variables shows, as expected, higher proportions intermarried in the urban and most diversified milieus despite the fact that at the time of marriage many couples recorded in the census in an urban milieu may have been living in a rural milieu when choosing a spouse, suggesting that if not misallocated the propensity to intermarry would have been even larger.
However, men of Middle Eastern ancestries are more likely to intermarry than women of these ancestries, while the opposite pattern is observed for men and women of East and Southeast Asian ancestries.
One of the crucial reasons why children from Orthodox families intermarry at a dramatically lower rate -- less than 5 percent--is because they are so seldom allowed to come into contact with non-Jews.
A CENTURY AGO, THE BLACK writer Charles Chesnutt predicted confidently that in 100 years there would be no more "race problem," because blacks would intermarry with whites and disappear as a separate race.
Children brought up in Kwato tended to intermarry, and their anglicised off-spring were notable public figures in the late-colonial years, when fluency in English and personal self-assurance were unusual traits.
Today, the small number of Zoroastrians (150,000 persons) creates substantive obstacles to finding a suitable mate, particularly considering that Iranians and Parsis generally prefer not to intermarry among each other because of linguistic and cultural differences.
Here is Thomas Dixon, Jr., in The Leopard's Spots (1902): "You can never get solidarity in a nation of equal rights out of two hostile races that do not intermarry. In a Democracy you can not build a nation inside of a nation of two antagonistic races, and therefore the future American must be either an Anglo Saxon or a Mulatto.
Rikio Kishimoto, chair of the All-Japan Patriots Conference, insists that, among other things, Japanese should not intermarry with Westerners.
You might even argue that some people intermarry with Jews as a form of upward mobility.
While in the past, mixed marriages were more common between Jewish men and non-Jewish women, contemporary marriage is characterized by greater gender parity in terms of intermarrying--Jewish women are as likely to intermarry as Jewish men.
Mer Khamis, 52, was the son of a Jewish mother and an Arab father -- a rarity in a land where the two populations almost never intermarry. His split identity fueled a long career as an actor and a vocal activist against Israel's policies toward the Palestinians.