interleukin


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interleukin

 [in´ter-loo″kin]
one of several proteins important for lymphocyte proliferation. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is produced by macrophages and induces the production of interleukin-2 by T cells that have been stimulated by antigen or mitogen. Interleukin-2 (IL-2), produced by T cells, stimulates the proliferation of T cells bearing specific receptors for IL-2; these receptors are expressed in response to antigenic stimulation. IL-2 also seems to induce the production of interferon and is used as an anticancer drug in the treatment of a wide variety of solid malignant tumors. Another interleukin, interleukin-3 (IL-3) is necessary for the differentiation of suppressor T cells.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ter·leu·kin (IL),

(in'tĕr-lū'kin),
The name given to a group of multifunctional cytokines after their amino acid structure is known. They are synthesized by lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and certain other cells. See: lymphokine, cytokine.
[inter- + leukocyte + -in]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

interleukin

(ĭn′tər-lo͞o′kĭn)
n.
Any of various small proteins that are produced by a variety of cell types, especially T cells and other white blood cells, and that regulate many aspects of inflammation and the immune response, including stimulating the production of white blood cells and platelets.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

interleukin

Immunology Any of a family of cytokines produced by lymphocytes, monocytes, and other cells, which induce growth and differentiation of lymphoid cells and primitive hematopoietic stem cells;. See Biological response modifier.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·ter·leu·kin

(IL) (in'tĕr-lū'kin)
The name given to a group of multifunctional cytokines after their amino acid structure is known. They are synthesized by lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and some other cells.
See also: lymphokine, cytokine
[inter- + leukocyte + -in]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in·ter·leu·kin

(IL) (in'tĕr-lū'kin)
Group of eight multifunctional cytokines designated after their amino acid structure is known. They are synthesized by lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and some other cells.
See: cytokine
[inter- + leukocyte + -in]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Target: Interleukin Genetics/ genetics laboratory and remaining assets
Comparison of interleukin 18 (IL-18) in serum revealed a trend of decreasing IL-18 concentrations with an increase of creatine monohydrate in diet but this difference in IL-18 concentration between the treatments was statistically non significant (P = 0.16) (Fig.
This product release includes the following interleukins:
Paul, "Interleukin 4: signalling mechanisms and control of T cell differentiation," CIBA Foundation Symposia, no.
2 July 2012 - BTIG LLC acted the exclusive placement agent for the USD3m (EUR2.4m) private placement of Interleukin Genetics Inc's (OTCQB:ILIU) convertible preferred stock, the US genetic tests maker said today.
The level of interleukin in first hour was very high ( greater than 1000 pg/ml) in 17 samples while its median value was 100 pg/ml.
Interleukin production is higher in asthmatics than in people without the disorder.
The study investigated Oligonol intake on cortisol, interleukin (IL)-1[beta] and IL-6 concentrations at rest and after physical exercise in 19 healthy, sedentary males.
Primers were designed manually for first 3 exons of human Interleukin 2 gene sequence deduced from Ensemble Gene Location NCBI36:4:123591475:123597930:-1.