interiorization


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interiorization

[intir′ē·ərīzā′shən]
Etymology: L, interior, inner; Gk, izein, to cause
the merging of reflex and cognitive processes as a response to the environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was organized in four sub-programs: (i) first aid units, (ii) establishment of a doctor in a region of the interior (at least one to establish fixed residence in the participating municipality), (iii) interiorization of the nurse, and (iv) the Community Agents (36).
This brings us to the second point of contrast between the Stoic approach and the Aristotelian approach: the interiorization of the moral life.
These books seek to explore that change, the complex interactions between Daoxue, esoteric Buddhism, Taoist alchemy, Tiantai Budhism, and Zhengyi (Orthodox Unity) Taoism, and the many associated changes in law, medicine, economics, and politics that came with a new focus on rationalization, interiorization, and secularization and a single imperial government.
writes, "Christian consciousness stirs with new perceptions marking a progressive interiorization and expansion of the Body of Christ.
At least as much Romantic poetry feeds upon what Donald Davie once called "Articulate Energy" as it does upon interiorization, and Shelley was one of Davie's key exemplars.
The European decolonization is fictive, because it does not oppose, it endorses racialization and the interiorization of historic guilt in the figure of the migrant.
However, besides the transformations around the curriculum, we call attention to a new movement for change that crosses the training of psychologists in our country today: it is the interiorization and internationalization of Psychology courses.
This signals that her project for Leontes's interiorization of ongoing penitence is not so much fulfilled, but rather abandoned under the weight of the public reconciliation and reunion of Leontes, Hermione, and Perdita.
This embodiment and interiorization of time is consistent with the thinking of Teilhard de Chardin, about whom Ong wrote:
However, he argues, negativity and melancholia are integral parts of any revolution--as he seeks to demonstrate with a comparative analysis of the French Revolution--even if the post-Soviet transformation, as a negation of a negation, resulted in the unprecedented interiorization of negativity by society which led to collective melancholia.
And it is this interiorization that permits the universe to open itself to itself.
This interiorization "fragments both individual psyches and the community as a whole" (Perez-Torres 1997: 21-22) and it is life-denying inasmuch as Blacks can never live up to the standards they are being measured by.