interference

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interference

 [in″ter-fēr´ens]
1. opposition to or hampering of some activity.
2. impairment of cardiac impulse conduction due to refractoriness of the tissue; the refractoriness is a physiological response to passage of a preceding impulse.
3. a premature contact point on the occlusal surface of the teeth.
electromagnetic interference electrical signals of nonphysiological origin that may affect pacemaker function; they can either inappropriately inhibit pacemaker output or trigger unnecessary pulses. Pacemakers with bipolar leads are less sensitive to this.
occlusal i's areas of interference on teeth that hamper proper occlusion and smooth, gliding, harmonious jaw movements.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ter·fer·ence

(in'tĕr-fēr'ens),
1. The coming together of waves in various media in such a way that the crests of one series correspond to the hollows of the other, the two thus neutralizing each other; or so that the crests of the two series correspond, thus increasing the excursions of the waves.
2. Collision within the myocardium of two waves of excitation at the junction of territories controlled by each, as is seen in atrioventricular (AV) dissociation.
3. Also in AV dissociation, the disturbance of the regular rhythm of the ventricles by a conducted impulse from the atria, for example, by a ventricular capture (interference beat).
4. The condition in which infection of a cell by one virus prevents superinfection by another virus, or in which superinfection prevents effects that would result from infection by either virus alone, even though both viruses persist.
[inter- + L. ferio, to strike]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

interference

Lab medicine The effect that unmeasured components in a specimen or system have on the accuracy of a component being measured. See Electromagnetic interference, Matrix, Matrix interference, Matrix effect, Nerve interference.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·ter·fer·ence

(in'tĕr-fēr'ĕns)
1. The coming together of waves in various media in such a way that the crests of one series correspond to the hollows of the other, the two thus neutralizing each other; or so that the crests of the two series correspond, thus increasing the excursions of the waves.
2. Collision within the myocardium of two waves of excitation at the junction of territories controlled by each, as is seen in atrioventricular dissociation.
3. Also, in atrioventricular dissociation, the disturbance of the regular rhythm of the ventricles by a conducted impulse from the atria, e.g., by a ventricular capture (interference beat).
4. The condition in which infection of a cell by one virus prevents superinfection by another virus, or in which superinfection prevents effects that would result from infection by either virus alone, even though both viruses persist.
5. Effect of a component on the accuracy of measurement of the desired analyte.
[inter- + L. ferio, to strike]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

interference

see CHROMATID INTERFERENCE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

interference

Modification of light intensity arising from the joint effects of two or more coherent trains of light waves superimposed at the same point in space and arriving at the same instant. The waves may either reinforce each other, being in phase (constructive interference) or cancel each other, being out of phase (destructive interference). See coherent sources; Young's experiment; holography; phase; optical coherence tomography.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

in·ter·fer·ence

(in'tĕr-fēr'ĕns)
1. The coming together of waves in various media in such a way that the crests of one series correspond to the hollows of the other, the two thus neutralizing each other; or so that the crests of the two series correspond, thus increasing the excursions of the waves.
2. Condition in which infection of a cell by one virus prevents superinfection by another virus, or in which superinfection prevents effects that would result from infection by either virus alone, even though both viruses persist.
[inter- + L. ferio, to strike]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about interference

Q. Does omega-3 interfere with diabetes treatment? I’m a 55 years old man, and was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, along with high lipid levels several years ago. A couple of months ago I read that omega-3 can protect your heart and brain, so I started to take omega-3 pills every day. Yesterday I read in some website that omega-3 can interfere with the drugs I take to treat my diabetes- Is that right?

A. Omega-3 doesn’t influence the treatment of your diabetes, and since you have high lipids, that can contribute to some of the damage diabetes does to your body, omega-3, that may lower the lipid level in your may actually help you treat yourself overall better. However - consult your doctor. Better be safe than sorry...

Q. Will my bipolar meds (lamictal and depakote) interfere with my birth control pills? We have been married for the past 12 yrs but we don’t have a child because I am paranoid of delivery. But it doesn’t affect our intimacy. I am using birth control pills for the past few years and I could rely on it. Now the new problem is that I was recently diagnosed as bipolar-II. The Doctor prescribed some medicines for me. Will my bipolar meds (Lamictal and Depakote) interfere with my birth control pills?

A. there are interactions, birth control pills can reduce the amount of Lamictal in the blood, causing it to be less affective. the drug level in plasma should be monitored. ask both your therapists about it- your gynecologist and the psychiatrist.

More discussions about interference
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References in periodicals archive ?
The results suggest that home life interfering with work is specifically related to increased sick leave.
Sample dilutions, if performed, would further change the relative ratios of reagent and interfering antibodies.
I'm just an ordinary Mom-in-law, trying to do my job, But 'interfering' is of course, the thing that I most love, If I can teach you how to be, (in my quiet and gentle way) To be like me, for like as not, you'll be one too, one day.
Department of Labor, denied that the rule would result in the federal government interfering with how the states administer workers' comp or that the department was exceeding its statutory authority.
That is why, for example, there are no stations at 101.2 FM - the FCC won't risk interfering with the outlets at 101.1 and 101.3.
But, can the tenant rely on this clause to support a request for an injunction against the interfering behavior?
A dirty or contaminated mold will prevent the release agent from bonding to the mold surface, interfering with release and causing transfer to the surface of the part.
Again, the accusation of issuing threats can only lead to variation of bail terms once the DPP makes an application to withdraw the terms and has given grounds and evidence that the accused person is interfering with the witnesses or wants to commit a crime.
Karachi -- In a fresh spat with the federal government over the issue of policing powers to Rangers in Sindh, Pakistan Peoples Party Chairman Bilawal Bhutto Zardari had cautioned the centre to desist from interfering in provincial matters.
Women perceived more burnout than men, and also felt slightly more work-home conflict (work demands interfering with work life).
they lack tangible and political proof," Wehbeh said of Syria' s accusations against MP Jammal Jarrah of interfering in its internal affairs.