interbreed

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interbreed

(ĭn′tər-brēd′)
v. inter·bred (-brĕd′), inter·breeding, inter·breeds
v.intr.
1. To breed with individuals of another species, subspecies, or variety; crossbreed: dogs interbreeding with wolves.
2. To breed regularly with others of the same kind: a species as a group of individuals that interbreed.
v.tr.
To cause to interbreed.

interbreed

  1. to breed within a single family or strain to produce particular characteristics in the offspring.
  2. (also called
References in periodicals archive ?
Accumulating evidence of the physical effects of interbreeding, or hybridization, in nonhuman animals may offer some answers.
The researchers also looked for evidence of ancient interbreeding in previously acquired genomes of nearly 1,500 modern-day individuals from different parts of the world.
The professor told a meeting of the Royal Society in London that this interbreeding instilled modern man with a "hybrid vigour" that allowed it to go on and populate the world.
Evidence that Neandertal interbreeding began no more than 60,000 years ago supports the idea that a wave of H.
The researchers say these patterns provide evidence that hybrid species do emerge through interbreeding between distinct animal species.
Two independent investigations identify for the first time the specific parts of the human genome that seem to have been most affected by Stone Age interbreeding with Neandertais.
Researchers said that much more interbreeding went on between different species of humans than had been believed.
London, June 17 (ANI): A study has found that the first humans who left Africa were not able to cope with unfamiliar diseases, but by interbreeding with the local hominins they picked up genes that protected them.
Yet despite shared DNA, it's unclear whether, or how much, interbreeding actually occurred.
Swedish biologist Svante Svante Pddbo's team at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany have found the first definitive evidence of interbreeding.
A new study suggests that present-day Europeans share more genes with now-extinct Neandertals than do living Africans, at least partly because of interbreeding that took place some time between 37,000 and 86,000 years ago.