interbreed

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interbreed

(ĭn′tər-brēd′)
v. inter·bred (-brĕd′), inter·breeding, inter·breeds
v.intr.
1. To breed with individuals of another species, subspecies, or variety; crossbreed: dogs interbreeding with wolves.
2. To breed regularly with others of the same kind: a species as a group of individuals that interbreed.
v.tr.
To cause to interbreed.

interbreed

  1. to breed within a single family or strain to produce particular characteristics in the offspring.
  2. (also called

interbreed

to breed between animal or plant species, breeds, families.
References in periodicals archive ?
That suggests the signal came directly from ancient mixing with Neanderthals, and not recent interbreeding with other modern humans whose ancestors might have interbred with Neanderthals.
This confirms recent findings suggesting that the two populations interbred," says Labuda.
The populations that interbred were similar enough biologically so that they were able to produce fertile offspring, thus allowing genes to flow from one population to the other," he stated.
DNA extracted from this tiny fossil, unearthed in Siberia's Denisova Cave, unveiled a humanlike population that interbred with people in East Asia at least 44,000 years ago.
Durbin said he believes this could be because after the first humans left Africa 60,000 years ago, they were followed by waves of Africans who interbred with the ancestors of the earlier migrants.
At least 44,000 years ago, initial arrivals in Southeast Asia interbred with a humanlike population known as Denisovans that apparently had spread southward from Siberia.
An initial human entry into Asia included ancestors of groups now living in eastern Oceania, some of whom interbred with Denisovans, Reich's group concludes.
Despite the differences, we know that the two species have interbred opportunistically and probably on many occasions during the last 100,000 years," Shapiro said.
When Parham compared the HLA genes of people from different regions of the world with the Neanderthal and Denisovan HLAs, he found evidence that non-African humans picked up new alleles from the hominins they interbred with.
A new study of the Neandertal genome shows that humans and Neandertals interbred.
sapiens migrated from Africa to meet and interbred with other Homo species that have now become extinct.
It also intensifies debate about whether prehistoric people replaced or interbred with humanlike species encountered during migration.