interaural attenuation

interaural attenuation

the reduction in intensity, at one ear, of an acoustic stimulus presented to the other ear canal as the sound is transmitted through the head; for air conduction, the reduction approximates 35 dB, but for bone conduction, it is 10 dB or less.

in·ter·au·ral at·ten·u·a·tion

(in'tĕr-awr'ăl ă-ten'yū-ā'shŭn)
The reduction in intensity the head provides sound presented to one ear canal before it gets to the other ear; for air conduction, the reduction approximates 35 dB, but for bone conduction, it is only about 10 dB.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The advantage of a sound stimulus for OVEMPs (because of interaural attenuation) is that the ear that is stimulated is the ear from which the response arises, whereas with skull vibration (a much less specific stimulus), there is always a concern regarding the side from which the response has occurred.
Interaural attenuation for tubephone insert earphones.
Interaural attenuation using ER-3A insert earphones in auditory brain stem response testing.
Because interaural attenuation for bone-conduction stimuli is minimal or nonexistent, many audiologists believe that measurement of bone thresholds should always be performed with masking of the nontested ear.
For example, interaural attenuation produces cross-hearing in the nontest ear via bone conduction (BC).
In such patients, in order to provide 40-dB masking above the BC threshold in the nontest ear, the masking level may exceed interaural attenuation and produce an inadvertent threshold elevation by masking the test ear, as well.