intent

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intent

(ĭn-tĕnt′)
A state of mind that reflects one's aims, goals, or objectives. Intent is the key element of and basis for lawsuits brought against plaintiffs in a court of law.
References in periodicals archive ?
What was originally a jokey format is well on its way to becoming--like "I support him 110%"--a minimum unit of conversational currency, beneath which intentness is insufficiently over-conveyed.
I did not see God's purpose, I only saw his intentness and his entire relentlessness toward his means.
Eagerness, intentness, concentration, vigilance--all these I include in the connotation of "sceptic.
Because preoccupied and fearful attachment are characterized by both a negative view of the self's lovability and intentness, that is, affective intensity and attention to feelings (Searle & Meara, 1999), persons with these attachments may be especially reactive to attachment threats.
The women of New Guinea stand proudly: it is they who cast nets to haul in the catch; it is they also who perform dances to ward off the spirits who might assail them Long-hipped, long-armed & with necklaces of nuts & coral they dance, with precision & abandon at once Their fierceness, the look in their eyes is an intentness, a concentration .
Although the statuesque Virgin's attention is divided by her care to hold Jesus steady as He stands on her knee, she listens, with brown-eyed intentness, to her voluble cousin St Elizabeth, as does St Joseph, who is all amiability.
There is in Swinburne this childlike persistency, this intentness towards an opposite, and this evenly maintained tapping of a sinister, but familiar, source; this, to the onlooker, all-but-heartbreaking pursuit of the remorselessly magical and effortlessly patient replications of an aristocratically perceived nature whose patterns (like the taint of the D'Urbervilles, and Tess's murderous ace of hearts) are finite, and recognized (though never comprehended).
That is scientism, of course, driven by a Protestant intentness on having one's subjective perceptions validated by claims to the kind of objective truth that can be revealed by the scientific method.
Her wide-apart eyes looked his way with unseeing intentness.
The second element illustrated in this story is what I call intentness.