intent

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intent

(ĭn-tĕnt′)
A state of mind that reflects one's aims, goals, or objectives. Intent is the key element of and basis for lawsuits brought against plaintiffs in a court of law.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lawrence who, in The Study of Thomas Hardy, wrote more illuminatingly about The Return of the Native than anybody has managed since, also read The Rover with "astonishing intentness" as Paul Eggert reminds us ("Conrad's Last Novels: Surveillance and Action," The Conradian, 24:2 (autumn 1999).
I did not see God's purpose, I only saw his intentness and his entire relentlessness toward his means.
Eagerness, intentness, concentration, vigilance--all these I include in the connotation of "sceptic." ...
Because preoccupied and fearful attachment are characterized by both a negative view of the self's lovability and intentness, that is, affective intensity and attention to feelings (Searle & Meara, 1999), persons with these attachments may be especially reactive to attachment threats.
Although the statuesque Virgin's attention is divided by her care to hold Jesus steady as He stands on her knee, she listens, with brown-eyed intentness, to her voluble cousin St Elizabeth, as does St Joseph, who is all amiability.
The women of New Guinea stand proudly: it is they who cast nets to haul in the catch; it is they also who perform dances to ward off the spirits who might assail them Long-hipped, long-armed & with necklaces of nuts & coral they dance, with precision & abandon at once Their fierceness, the look in their eyes is an intentness, a concentration ...
There is in Swinburne this childlike persistency, this intentness towards an opposite, and this evenly maintained tapping of a sinister, but familiar, source; this, to the onlooker, all-but-heartbreaking pursuit of the remorselessly magical and effortlessly patient replications of an aristocratically perceived nature whose patterns (like the taint of the D'Urbervilles, and Tess's murderous ace of hearts) are finite, and recognized (though never comprehended).
Her wide-apart eyes looked his way with unseeing intentness. "I didn't think so," she said.
The second element illustrated in this story is what I call intentness. By this I mean that the two gardeners really focused on every aspect of their interactions in the yard.
As O then settles, with both dejection and apprehension, into dozing off and rocking in a chair (that has two additional watching eyes in its headrest), E's face, which is O's "but with [a] very different expression, impossible to describe, neither severity nor benignity, but rather acute intentness (47)," purposely moves out of the angle of the safety zone to confront O with a direct and aggressive gaze.
They are like so many cages, so many small theatres, in which each actor is alone, perfectly individualized and constantly visible." Hardy's portrayal of the "watchful intentness" (p.