intemperance


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in·tem·per·ance

(in-tem'pĕr-ăns),
Lack of proper self-control, usually in reference to the use of alcoholic beverages. Compare: incontinence (2).
[L. intemperantia, fr. in-, neg. + temperantia, moderation]

intemperance

Lack of restraint in personal indulgence in any activity, such as alcoholic consumption, likely to be harmful in excess.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patience illustrates how fortitude depends on temperance, portraying Jonah as cowardly because of his pre-existing intemperance. Building on the interaction of the virtues, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight dramatizes the virtue tradition's ambiguity.
He was a miser, melancholy recluse who swung between extremes of abstinence and intemperance, and was capable of great cruelty.
True, Eversource set a new standard for intemperance in corporate public relations by declaring it was "shocked and outraged" by the decision.
This transforms the SK, from being just a miniature version of barangay politics, to a true learning environment where youthful inexperience, intemperance and overall unreadiness aren't toxic risk factors but starting points for the growth, development and the honing of new leaders.
The speed and intemperance of Trump's counterpunches suggest that the president probably feels at risk.
Responsibility invariably lies with the president's intemperance and dishonesty.
There was a great deal of sympathy for Reid given his wife's intemperance, the fact the murder did not appear premeditated and he had been struck first.
De Quincey vigorously defends himself against the charge that his opium habit arose from mere perversity of will coupled with intemperance of appetite.
If the fashionable swearer of our eastern cities should be equally privileged he would be disgusted with the poverty of his native vocabulary, and if the modern apostles of temperance became cognizant of the elasticity and amplitude of the English language, as exemplified in this versatile class, intemperance in their eyes would assume the proportions of a minor evil, and the Government of the Dominion would be deluged by their petitions for special legislation, offensive and defensive against the irreverent bull-whacker.
He also looks at early baseball managers and captains and their influence on each other, the earnings and occupations of players, the careers of sports manufacturers Al Reach and Ben Shibe, player intemperance and misogynistic behavior, the character and culture of spectators, and where the game was played, as well as why 19th-century players were neglected by baseballAEs Hall of Fame selectors.
"A man taking a drink at a bar under an umbrella is certainly not an example of conviviality," wrote a New York Times reporter in 1892, "and a row of men at bars retiring with their respective drinks under their several umbrellas, like so many inedible fungi of enormous size, present, one would suppose, a picture of the horrors of intemperance more dismal than was ever drawn by the late and ophidian [temperance crusader] John B.
Yet, whereas in popular temperance rhetoric the condition of the drunkard's home was reductively explained with statements such as "all the difference was made by [...] the bottle" (Newton 1861, 78), in Johnson's text, the condition of the house is not wholly attributed to "the Giant Intemperance" (Newton 1861, 38) and its effects on the tenants.