intellectual

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intellectual

1. Pert. to the mind.
2. Possessing intellect.
References in periodicals archive ?
The paper concludes in support of the position of Randjarv's article that intellectuality is border crossing.
Thus, it is a matter of thinking politics based on itself and not starting from other disciplines, politics has its own intellectuality.
This result is not surprising because GPA is a measure of a student's intellectuality and ability.
Zarif also referred to the deal clinched between the Islamic Republic and the permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany in November as a victory for intellectuality, saying that, with this agreement, everyone emerged victorious.
This gives to every colored man, in proportion to his intellectuality, a sort of dual personality; there is one phase of him which is disclosed only in the freemasonry of his own race:
Lonergan has the resources for retrieving, in the words of Michael Buckley, a distinctively religious form of intellectuality.
That is the main reason that in our modern civilization, religiosity, ideology, and intellectuality are highly fragmented and in most democratic civilized nations they maintain their independent views concerning human earthy life and eternal life.
Math contests encourage intellectuality and competition which helps them in practical life.
Echoing Owens's assertion that the deconstructive impulse in women's art must be considered "an instance of postmodern thought," Pollock maintains that these artists were not simply applying postmodern theories: "I want to sweep away any suggestion that after 1970 a number of artists turned away from art to 'theory' and imposed its alien intellectuality upon the virgin aesthetic field" (75).
It is part and parcel of the kind of intellectuality that is typically Jewish.
In our view, it is not so much in ICT as in the development of a diffuse intellectuality that one should seek the primordial factor of the transition towards a capitalism founded on knowledge and towards new forms of the division of labor.
Of the three colonial archetypes examined in Chapter 1, only Sor Juana represents a possible model of feminine intellectuality, but Hind uses her as an example of the tendency--still current in the twentieth century--to divorce the woman intellectual from the body and biological maternity.