intellectual disability


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Related to intellectual disability: mental retardation

intellectual disability

n.
A disorder with childhood onset that is characterized by limitations in intellectual functions, such as reasoning and learning, and difficulty carrying out the functions of daily life. Also called intellectual development disorder.

intellectual disability

1. In childhood, any learning disability or form of mental retardation.
2. In adulthood or old-age, any form of brain injury that impacts cognition; or any form of dementia.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Pakistan, the uses of information and communication technology (ICT) to facilitate in the education of students with intellectual disability are still not evident particularly in the institutes of children with intellectual disability, which causes lack of mathematical skills in intellectually challenged children.
But scholars have demonstrated that the only factor that seems to matter is the fact of these individuals' intellectual disability. (263) Cloud et al.
Our findings suggested that the parents/guardians were lacking information on menstruation in girls with intellectual disability. Very often, most of the parents have the perception that it is too early for them to worry about the menses of their intellectual disability daughter.
In the communication of the diagnosis, it is up to the health professional to talk to the family firmly and forcefully, offering to listen patiently to the questions and report sincerely on the impact that the intellectual disability will have on the life of the child and of the family.
Intellectual disability of child is whole life stigma for parents specifically for mothers.
What has changed in these definitions and their application are: (a) terminology that has evolved from mental deficiency and mental retardation to intellectual disability; (b) an increasing acceptance of the equal weight given to adaptive behavior and intellectual functioning in the diagnosis of ID; (c) a better understanding of the factor structure of adaptive behavior (i.e., conceptual, social, and practical adaptive skills); (d) the use of the 95% confidence interval to establish the range of scores within which the individual's true score falls; and (e) an increased use of a subclassification system based on the person's needs for supports rather than the individual's intelligence quotient (IQ) level.
In the previous section, I demonstrated that self-expression would allow this kind of language of witnessing, the unsayable, the silence, the language of the wound, as well as the experience of the trauma of people with intellectual disability. Lakawa is correct when she argues, "The hermeneutic of rupture disrupts, discerns, and disorders faith claims and narratives that negate wounds.
Atkins stressed that individuals with intellectual disability "have diminished capacity to understand and process information, to communicate, to abstract from mistakes and learn from experience, to engage in logical reasoning, to control impulses, and to understand the reactions of others." (6) This, in turn, reduces the retributive and deterrent purposes of capital punishment due to the fact that persons with intellectual disability have significantly reduced moral culpability due to their cognitive limitations and also makes it less likely that they will be able "to make the calculated judgments that are the premise for the deterrence rationale." (7)
Inclusion in sports is supported in theory, but in reality it is usually limited in and only within the intellectual disability community.
"Globally, between two and three per cent of the global population has an intellectual disability, which translates to as many as 200 million people," it said, noting that data from the MENA region is "scarce."

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