integration

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integration

 [in″tĕ-gra´shun]
1. assimilation; anabolic action or activity.
2. the combining of different acts so that they cooperate toward a common end; coordination.
3. constructive assimilation of knowledge and experience into the personality.
4. in bacterial genetics, assimilation of genetic material from one bacterium (donor) into the chromosome of another (recipient).
bilateral integration the coordinated use of both sides of the body during activity.
integration of learning the incorporation of previously acquired concepts and behaviors into a variety of new situations, a cognitive performance component of occupational therapy.
primary integration the recognition by a child that his or her body is a unit apart from the environment; it is probably not achieved before the second half of the first year of life.
secondary integration the sublimation of the separate elements of the early sexual instinct into the mature psychosexual personality.
vertical integration the structuring of hospital services in such a manner that a continuum of care is provided.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·te·gra·tion

(in'tĕ-grā'shŭn),
1. The state of being combined, or the process of combining, into a complete and harmonious whole.
2. In physiology, the process of building up, as by, for example, accretion or anabolism.
3. In mathematics, the process of ascertaining a function from its differential.
4. In molecular biology, a recombination event in which a genetic element is inserted.
[L. integro, pp. -atus, to make whole, fr. integer, whole]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

integration

(ĭn′tĭ-grā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of integrating.
b. The state of becoming integrated.
2. Psychology The organization of the psychological or social traits and tendencies of a personality into a harmonious whole.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

integration

Informatics
The successful interfacing of disparate platforms, versions of software, and devices into a coherent functioning information system.
 
Molecular biology
The insertion of bases into a nucleic acid, either DNA or RNA.
 
Psychiatry
(1) The absorption of information, experiences, and emotions into the personality.
(2) The incorporation of functions at various levels of psychosexual development.
 
Vox populi
The incorporation of multiple units into one; assimilation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

integration

Informatics The successful interfacing of disparate platforms, versions of software, and devices into a coherent functioning information system Psychiatry The incorporation of new and old data, experience, and emotional capacities into the personality; also refers to the organization and amalgamation of functions at various levels of psychosexual development Vox populi The incorporation of multiple units into one; assimilation. See Horizontal integration, Osteointegration, Seamless integration, Vertical integration.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·te·gra·tion

(in'tĕ-grā'shŭn)
1. The state of being combined, or the process of combining, into a complete and harmonious whole.
See also: sensory integration
2. physiology The process of building up (e.g., accretion, anabolism).
3. mathematics The process of ascertaining a function from its differential.
4. molecular biology A recombination event in which a genetic element is inserted.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

integration

the insertion of DNA from one organism into the recipient genome of another.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·te·gra·tion

(in'tĕ-grā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, attachment of tissue to an alloplastic material.
2. Being combined, or the process of combining, into a complete and harmonious whole.
3. In physiology, the process of building up.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about integration

Q. My child is suffering from autism and was told to have Auditory Integration Therapy…what is it?

A. An Alternative Treatments where the child listens to different sounds with the goal to improve on language comprehension and it helps receive more balanced sensory input from the environment they live in. It has been reported that children had significant behavioral and language gains after this treatment.

Q. How can I get my son into a normal school? He was diagnosed as autistic but he is intelligent and is able to go through normal education. But I don’t want him to be socially disconnected…

A. If done in a proper way it can be an excellent idea! Your son will flourish and will develop as best as he can. But if just moving him to a regular school without any preparation to him, class and teacher- that can end up very bad. So talk to the teacher the headmaster and councilor explain and work up a plan. Then it must be explained to the class. and don’t forget your son…he needs to understand that he might get unpleasant reactions sometimes.

More discussions about integration
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References in periodicals archive ?
Self-Service Integration: Enhanced Iris AI, New Patterns Catalog
Integration technologies and concepts have evolved over the last decade, leading to a multitude of architectures and products in the IT market.
Unlike Fortune 500 companies, most firms have not made enough acquisitions to have been able to develop expertise with the integration process.
Chapter 2, "Building the Business Case for Integration," describes the business case for integration including hard and soft, tangible and intangible benefits.
The wider the differences, the rougher the integration. But even apparently small differences can be difficult to resolve.
A clearly defined project management approach facilitates faster decision-making and organizes the entire integration effort.
But important, too, are issues such as leadership and executives impact on longer-term performance; the dynamics of the combined company's business mix and opportunities for growth; and integration skills and the ability to build revenues from the newly formed franchise.

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