integration

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integration

 [in″tĕ-gra´shun]
1. assimilation; anabolic action or activity.
2. the combining of different acts so that they cooperate toward a common end; coordination.
3. constructive assimilation of knowledge and experience into the personality.
4. in bacterial genetics, assimilation of genetic material from one bacterium (donor) into the chromosome of another (recipient).
bilateral integration the coordinated use of both sides of the body during activity.
integration of learning the incorporation of previously acquired concepts and behaviors into a variety of new situations, a cognitive performance component of occupational therapy.
primary integration the recognition by a child that his or her body is a unit apart from the environment; it is probably not achieved before the second half of the first year of life.
secondary integration the sublimation of the separate elements of the early sexual instinct into the mature psychosexual personality.
vertical integration the structuring of hospital services in such a manner that a continuum of care is provided.

in·te·gra·tion

(in'tĕ-grā'shŭn),
1. The state of being combined, or the process of combining, into a complete and harmonious whole.
2. In physiology, the process of building up, as by, for example, accretion or anabolism.
3. In mathematics, the process of ascertaining a function from its differential.
4. In molecular biology, a recombination event in which a genetic element is inserted.
[L. integro, pp. -atus, to make whole, fr. integer, whole]

integration

/in·te·gra·tion/ (in″tĕ-gra´shun)
4. assimilation of genetic material from one bacterium (donor) into the chromosome of another (recipient).

integration

(ĭn′tĭ-grā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of integrating.
b. The state of becoming integrated.
2. Psychology The organization of the psychological or social traits and tendencies of a personality into a harmonious whole.

integration

[in′təgrā′shən]
Etymology: L, integrare, to make whole
1 the act or process of unifying or bringing together.
2 (in psychology) the organization of all elements of the personality into a coordinated functional whole that is in harmony with the environment, one of the primary goals in psychotherapy. It involves the assimilation of insight and the coordination of new and old data, experiences, and emotional reactions so that an effective change can occur in behavior, thinking, or feeling. See also insight. integrate, v.

integration

Informatics
The successful interfacing of disparate platforms, versions of software, and devices into a coherent functioning information system.
 
Molecular biology
The insertion of bases into a nucleic acid, either DNA or RNA.
 
Psychiatry
(1) The absorption of information, experiences, and emotions into the personality.
(2) The incorporation of functions at various levels of psychosexual development.
 
Vox populi
The incorporation of multiple units into one; assimilation.

integration

Informatics The successful interfacing of disparate platforms, versions of software, and devices into a coherent functioning information system Psychiatry The incorporation of new and old data, experience, and emotional capacities into the personality; also refers to the organization and amalgamation of functions at various levels of psychosexual development Vox populi The incorporation of multiple units into one; assimilation. See Horizontal integration, Osteointegration, Seamless integration, Vertical integration.

in·te·gra·tion

(in'tĕ-grā'shŭn)
1. The state of being combined, or the process of combining, into a complete and harmonious whole.
See also: sensory integration
2. physiology The process of building up (e.g., accretion, anabolism).
3. mathematics The process of ascertaining a function from its differential.
4. molecular biology A recombination event in which a genetic element is inserted.

integration

the insertion of DNA from one organism into the recipient genome of another.

integration

(1) in mathematics, the use of calculus to compute the cumulative addition of one variable with respect to another, displayed graphically as the area under the curve of one variable plotted against another; (2) the summing of different types of information; (3) in physiology, coherent function of interacting systems; (4) in society, for example in medicine or social services, the linking of different approaches or organizations.

in·te·gra·tion

(in'tĕ-grā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, attachment of tissue to an alloplastic material.
2. Being combined, or the process of combining, into a complete and harmonious whole.
3. In physiology, the process of building up.

integration

1. assimilation; anabolic action or activity.
2. the combining of different acts so that they cooperate toward a common end; coordination.
3. in bacterial genetics, assimilation of genetic material from one bacterium (donor) into the chromosome of another (recipient).

industrial integration
integration of the various levels of an industry so that they are all working in unison, usually under the same ownership. Thus in the poultry industry it is commonplace for the same company to grow the feed, hatch the chickens, franchise feeders, slaughter the broiler output in their own plant and wholesale the dressed birds to retailers.

Patient discussion about integration

Q. My child is suffering from autism and was told to have Auditory Integration Therapy…what is it?

A. An Alternative Treatments where the child listens to different sounds with the goal to improve on language comprehension and it helps receive more balanced sensory input from the environment they live in. It has been reported that children had significant behavioral and language gains after this treatment.

Q. How can I get my son into a normal school? He was diagnosed as autistic but he is intelligent and is able to go through normal education. But I don’t want him to be socially disconnected…

A. If done in a proper way it can be an excellent idea! Your son will flourish and will develop as best as he can. But if just moving him to a regular school without any preparation to him, class and teacher- that can end up very bad. So talk to the teacher the headmaster and councilor explain and work up a plan. Then it must be explained to the class. and don’t forget your son…he needs to understand that he might get unpleasant reactions sometimes.

More discussions about integration
References in periodicals archive ?
pursuit of the Integrationist Norm without as great a requirement to
Presumably, civil rights and freedom are integrationist because their black advocate intends to exercise them among white Americans.
McGraw is surely correct that when a secularist liberal tells a religious integrationist that he or she needs to behave, the appeal or command is likely to provoke a vigorous reaction.
Thus, integrationist organizations will under some circumstances take into account the preferences of those countries less oriented towards integrationist policies, especially if those countries weigh heavily in terms of the potential benefits they offer (high values of [b.
It has worked its way into the political domain to challenge integrationist strategies in education, housing and immigration policy.
Clark, however, as all the obituaries in the major newspapers of this country made dear, remained a diehard integrationist, and that was why, in the end, he thought that much of what he worked so hard for had failed, and the reason why that genuine sorrow I witnessed that afternoon in 1990 has stayed with me.
This means that even King's embrace of the Black integrationist traditions of liberalism, as seen in the abolitionism of Frederick Douglass or in the twentieth-century protest and justice work of W.
Even Integrationist parents in these districts might resist having their children attend schools that are overwhelming minority.
Racial politics had shifted during his time abroad: The integrationist tendencies of the civil rights era had been joined or supplanted by the defiant rhetoric of Black Power.
Rael dismisses such approaches and concludes that, "African American spokespersons laid claim to a powerful tradition of public speech, in a way that modern historiography has trouble labeling as anything other than integrationist, assimilationist, and therefore accommodationist" (283).
To understand this argument, it is helpful first to explain the integrationist perspective that underlies it.
This is difficult in a country where the last two centuries have seen the realization of the old integrationist dream and the near extinction of dialects--both as results of government policies.

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