insult

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in·sult

(in'sŭlt),
An injury, attack, or trauma.
[LL. insultus, fr L. insulto, to spring on]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

insult

(ĭn-sŭlt′)
v. in·sulted, in·sulting, in·sults
n. (ĭn′sŭlt′)
a. Medicine A bodily injury, irritation, or trauma.
b. Something that causes injury, irritation, or trauma: "the middle of the Bronx, buffeted and poisoned by the worst environmental insults that urban America can dish out" (William K. Stevens).

in·sult′er n.
in·sult′ing·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

insult

Medtalk noun Any stressful stimulus which, under normal circumstances, does not affect the host organism, but which may result in morbidity, when it occurs in a background of preexisting compromising conditions
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·sult

(in'sŭlt)
An injury, attack, or trauma.
[LL. insultus, fr L. insulto, to spring on]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

insult

Any injury, trauma, poisoning or irritation to the body.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The modern editor of al-Nawawi's Majmuc (Hutay'i, 21: 353) cites approvingly Abu Bakr al-Farisi's position that dhimmi insulters of the Prophet should be executed as a hadd punishment.
Yohanan Friedmann has demonstrated that on the crucial issue of whether or not the Muslim insulter of the Prophet may repent of his crime, support may be found in each of the four Sunni madhahib for either repentance or the impossibility of repentance.
As was mentioned, if one considers the law against insulting the Prophet as a subcategory of apostasy from Islam, the paradigmatic insulter of the Prophet must be a Muslim.
At the outset of al-Sarim al-maslul, Ibn Taymiyya provides a brief and unsatisfying account of the views of the Shafi'i school on the non-Muslim insulter of the Prophet.
There are five relevant passages on the issue of the putative non-Muslim insulter of the Prophet in al-Umm and they contradict one another.
Ibn Taymiyya did not look to Kitab al-Umm for Shaft CT precedents for the harsh treatment of the insulter of the Prophet; he found them in works by the Shafi'i jurists Ibn Mundhir and Abu Sulayman al-Khattabi (d.