insular

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insular

 [in´su-lar]
pertaining to the insula or to an island, as the islets of Langerhans.

in·su·lar

(in'sū-lăr),
Relating to any insula, especially the island of Reil.

insular

/in·su·lar/ (-sdbobr-ler) pertaining to the insula or to an island, as the islands of Langerhans.

insular

(ĭn′sə-lər, ĭns′yə-)
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, or constituting an island.
b. Living or located on an island.
2.
a. Suggestive of the isolated life of an island: "He is an exceedingly insular man, so deeply private as to seem inaccessible to the scrutiny of a novelist" (Leonard Michaels).
b. Circumscribed and detached in outlook and experience; narrow or provincial.
3. Anatomy Of or relating to isolated tissue or an island of tissue.

in′su·lar·ism, in′su·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
in′su·lar·ly adv.

in·su·lar

(in'sŭ-lăr)
Relating to any insula, especially the island of Reil.

insular

pertaining to the insula or to an island, as the islands of Langerhans.
References in periodicals archive ?
These findings have important implications for human insularity and how we must study it.
But marketplace conditions have changed, and insularity now works primarily to hamper board of director accountability to shareholders.
Insularity used to be a particularly British disease.
Shibata's photographs are peculiarly critical of the Japanese character--in all its insularity and hermeticism--even as they admire and articulate it.
Plaid leader Ieuan Wyn Jones's response smacked of insularity.
Such attitudes are founded upon ignorance, insularity, and a failure to comprehend the impact of inflexible economic policy.
Indeed, its most important message is that an art world limited by its own insularity and elitism must begin to examine its relative ineffectiveness in confronting the high-pressure, mass-media tactics of our enemies.
But Britain is still prone to occasional insularity of the worst kind, when it fails to notice what even its nearest neighbours are doing.
The historical insularity of the United States has given way to an era of new vulnerabilities,'' the report said.
In addition, the insularity and racism within our own communities have often prevented us from building viable coalitions with other communities of color.
Kubo whirls, spins, and leaps along among jiving, jitterbugging pairs of dancers, never finding a partner or friend among these tall foreigners, but apparently accepting their insularity in the right sort of spirit.
Pointing out that, in the water-borne world of medieval long-distance transport, insularity means, primarily, `cultural interaccessibility', Hildegard Tristram introduces the volume with a thought-provoking account of the significance of vernacular writing in medieval Britain (and of the role of the Cambridge Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic tripos in its modern reception).