insular

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insular

 [in´su-lar]
pertaining to the insula or to an island, as the islets of Langerhans.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·su·lar

(in'sū-lăr),
Relating to any insula, especially the island of Reil.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

insular

(ĭn′sə-lər, ĭns′yə-)
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, or constituting an island.
b. Living or located on an island.
2.
a. Suggestive of the isolated life of an island: "He is an exceedingly insular man, so deeply private as to seem inaccessible to the scrutiny of a novelist" (Leonard Michaels).
b. Circumscribed and detached in outlook and experience; narrow or provincial.
3. Anatomy Of or relating to isolated tissue or an island of tissue.

in′su·lar·ism, in′su·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
in′su·lar·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·su·lar

(in'sŭ-lăr)
Relating to any insula, especially the island of Reil.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Hogle has recently re-defined the Gothic-Romantic relation as one where "the most troubling historical contradictions of the time" are "'thrown off' in Gothic symbols within new Romantic poems, and are abjected by the Gothic elements," thereby facilitating a subjectified Romantic idealism, or, given the present context, insularism. (41) The Gothic troubles Englishness by territorializing one's own unconscious out there in regions beyond the island (Catholic Europe in The Italian and The Monk; the East in Vathek and Byron's Oriental Tales).
Downing's inversion of Kuhnian epistemology underscores the ideology of disciplinary insularism, a politics, I believe, that gets away from Kuhn and contemporary educators, relativism and all.
As Bell points out, European interpretations of human rights may become "aware" of their "insularism" in contact with Asian ones (and vice versa.) (66) The discursive perspective aims to turn the abstract universalism of the liberal view into a universalism which is more sensitive to the historical context and processes of mutual learning.
This is stretching the limits of insularism a little too far.
(4) Novick evinces a wry scepticism about the paranoia, ethnocentric insularism, and sectarian complacency discursively produced by contemporary evocations and institutional memorializations of the Holocaust in the United States.
The argument is this: Protectionism and insularism impede innovation, depriving our children of the comfort and security that progress and economic growth bring.