instrumental activities of daily living


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instrumental activities of daily living

A series of life functions necessary for maintaining a person's immediate environment–eg, obtaining food, cooking, laundering, housecleaning, managing one's medications, phone use; IADL measures a person's–elderly, mentally handicapped or terminally ill ability to live independently. See Dependency.

in·stru·men·tal ac·tiv·i·ties of dai·ly liv·ing

(IADL) (in'strŭ-men'tăl ak-tiv'i-tēz dā'lē liv'ing)
Activities oriented to interactions with the environment, more complex than activities of daily living (ADL); usually optional or can be delegated (e.g., care of pets, financial management, meal preparation, clean up and shopping).
Synonym(s): personal activities of daily living.

instrumental activities of daily living

Abbreviation: IADL
Those activities and tasks beyond basic self-care that are necessary for living independently. These activities include communication, mobility, cooking, using the telephone, cleaning the house, doing laundry, shopping, going to the bank, and managing medications.
Synonym: extended activities of daily living See: activities of daily living; self-care
References in periodicals archive ?
To evaluate the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL's), it was used the version adapted in Brazil of Lawton and Brody scale (14), that evaluates the capacity of an individual to prepare meals, perform household chores, do the laundry, handle their own medication, use the telephone, manage money, go shopping and use public transportation.
Prediction of incident dementia: Impact of impairment in instrumental activities of daily living and mild cognitive impairment-results from the German study on ageing, cognition, and dementia in primary care patients.
2008 Functional disability in activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living among Nepalese Newar elderly.
* Percentage of participants answering comfortable and "relatively comfortable" in economic status; ([dagger]) percentage of participants regarded as dependent in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL score of <5); ([double dagger]) percentage of participants classified as having depressive status (K6 score of [greater than or equal to] 5).
In addition, it has been observed in normal, community-dwelling older adults without HIV that speed of processing is important to perform instrumental activities of daily living such as driving (Ball, Edwards, & Ross, 2007).
Cognitive and neuro-imaging predictors of instrumental activities of daily living. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 13, 747-757.
A group of North American contributors working in psychiatry, psychology, gerontology, neurology, occupational therapy, and sports medicine discuss examining real-world functioning from the perspectives of neuropsychology, human factors, and occupational therapy, including cross-cultural issues; the application of traditional neuropsychological tests; innovative performance-based test instruments and batteries that emphasize ecological validity; and approaches to evaluating the instrumental activities of daily living, vocational functioning, medication management, and automobile driving.
Executive function is important because it can indicate the person's capacity in instrumental activities of daily living (Juby et al 2002).
Cognitive and neuroimaging predictors of instrumental activities of daily living. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 13, 747-757.
Research in the field of aging, for example, has a history of referencing specific tasks that exist within domains referred to as activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living (Granger, Mann, Ottenbacher, Tomita, & Fiedler, 1994; Katz, 1983; Lawton & Brody, 1969).
BEST TOOL: The Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADL) is ah appropriate instrument to assess independent living skills (Lawton & Brody, 1969).
Three outcomes were studied: 1) Disability in activities of daily living (ADLs) such as bathing, dressing, or eating; 2) disability in instrumental activities of daily living (lADLs) such as preparing meals or doing light housework; and 3) mobility function.

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