instrument

(redirected from instrument sharpening)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

in·stru·ment

(in'strū-ment),
A tool or implement.
[L. instrumentum]

instrument

A tool—e.g., questionnaire, diary—used in a clinical trial to capture data, as well as the information and documentation that supports the data’s use.

Instruments include clearly defined methods and instructions for administration and responses to queries, a standard format for data collection and well-documented methods for scoring, analysing and interpreting results.

in·stru·ment

(in'strŭ-mĕnt)
A tool or implement.
[L. instrumentum]

instrument

1. A means by which something is done. An agency used to accomplish some purpose.
2. A surgical instrument.
3. A displaying or recording device.

in·stru·ment

(in'strŭ-mĕnt)
A tool or implement.
[L. instrumentum]

Patient discussion about instrument

Q. How do i know what essential tools/instruments i need to buy for my baby?

A. we bought a lot of crap when out first born came along. most of it was really not useful and we could easily do without. form what i remember, we should have bought maybe second hand crib and not a new one, all this miniature outfits were really expendable. the baby grows VERY fast. all kind of shoes- until the day he start walking, it's just a waste of time.

More discussions about instrument
References in periodicals archive ?
Especially outstanding are the chapters on infection control, ergonomics, and instrument sharpening. In addition, the material is enhanced by the use of color photographs, as well as detailed tables and illustrations.
A buffer time of 10 to 15 minutes and should bebooked in the morning and afternoon to allocate for preview and documentation of charts, instrument sharpening, and stretching, or to complete client services.
A survey conducted by Sanders and Turcotte revealed that proper posture is the most effective strategy for maintaining musculoskeletal health, followed by stretching exercises, personal relaxation, instrument sharpening, well-fitting gloves, indirect vision, and adjustable work stations.[15]