instructional simulation

instructional simulation

Graduation education A simulation used to help students acquire knowledge and skills through surrogate experiences; simulation success hinges on the degree to which it resembles a real experience
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0 tools in cooperative learning; literacy education in online learning; instructional models; online teaching and learning practices for English language arts, math, action research, and teacher leadership courses; and innovative practices like instructional simulation games and remote field experiences.
The results indicate that instructional simulation designers need to account for the influence that classroom instruction will have on student performance during these types of simulations.
The article will conclude with a discussion of areas where future research in this area of study might be directed, what the implications are for instructional simulation designers and some general thoughts on how the simulation impacted students in this particular class.
An important factor to consider when examining how effective an instructional simulation will be is the means by which a user navigates through the simulation and accesses information along the way.
Problems based on these goals and standards were developed and integrated into an instructional simulation game (described fully in the Instruments section below) in which participants played a peer-aged character working for an aunt and uncle's home remodeling business.
The computer-based instructional simulation game was developed using Macromedia Authorware 5.
For an instructional simulation to be effective, however, it must be well conceived and carefully implemented (Lajoie, 2000).
This study looked at the effect of contextual advisement and competition on transfer of mathematics skills in a computer-based instructional simulation game and simulation in which game participants helped their "aunt and uncle" fix up a house.
Key features include: problem-centered architecture; sound instructional philosophy implemented consistently; whole curricula for adults and young adults, with emphasis on work and life contexts; flexible, modular structure incorporating a range of software types, such as coached instructional simulation, tools and resources, direct tutorial instruction, and practice; individualized competency-based placement, progress checking, and portfolio assessment for high accountability; instructional management system capable of flexible but close integration of all components to give instructors the leverage needed to manage a complex of individual learning plans; and "just in time" delivery via the Internet, local area networks, or stand-alone work stations located anywhere.

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